Historic Houses

Updated May 19, 2022

The most historic, notable and distinctive classic houses now for sale in the Triad

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Featured Listing
Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties
Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties
Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

Recent Sales

  • $895,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,464 square feet, 7.71 acres
  • Price/square foot: $363
  • Built in 1910 (per county)
  • Listed May 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $230,000, August 1998
  • Note: The property includes an in-ground saltwater pool, log cabin, 5-plus acres of horse pastures, a barn with a two-car and a shed.
    • The listing gives a 1908 date for the house.

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County

300 Wentworth Drive, Greensboro
The Leslie and Alyce Lane House

  • $1.275 million
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,563 square feet (per county), 0.48 acre
  • Price/square foot: $358
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed April 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $812,000, December 2005
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The first owners were Leslie Clute Lane (1885-1967) and Alyce Nealon Lane (1882-1966). Leslie was a traveling salesman. They bought the property in 1924 and lived in the house from 1926 to 1941.

907 Sunset Drive, Greensboro
The Kenneth and Katherine Maddox House
sale pending April 7, 2022

  • $1.175 million
  • 4 bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms, 3,660 square feet, 0.42 acre
  • Price/square foot: $321
  • Built in 1934
  • Listed April 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $275,000, June 1983
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The property includes a swimming pool.
    • The house has had only two owners. The original owners were Kenneth Pitts Maddox (1907-1978) and Mary Katherine Martin Maddox (1909-1976). He was manager of the Julius R. Pitts Lumber Yard. They bought the property in 1935. Kenneth left the house to their daughter, who sold it to the current owners in 1983.

2309 Lafayette Avenue, Greensboro
Blog post on Greensboro Historic Homes — Two Million-Dollar Mansions Sell Suddenly in Irving Park, But You Still Have a Few to Choose From
listing withdrawn December 19, 2021; relisted January 31, 2022
sale pending March 23, 2022

  • $999,000 (originally $1.049 million)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,002 square feet, 0.66 acre
  • Price/square foot: $333
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed July 13, 2020
  • Last sale: $550,000, March 2003
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Listing: The property includes a detached 1,600 square-foot “guest house/garage/rec room/office” with two bathrooms. Also “Moss walkways, Blue Stone patios & Koi Pond.”
    • From 1924 to 1930, the property was sold five times. In 1930, it was bought by its first long-term owner, surgeon Richard B. Davis. He owned the house until 1945.
    • Hampton Shuping, an executive with J.P. Stevens and his wife, Margaret, owned the house from 1958 to 1982. Stevens may be best remembered today as the bitterly anti-union textile company that served as the villain in the film Norma Rae. Stevens’s resistance to unionization was characterized by The New York Times in 1981 as “one of the ugliest episodes in recent labor history.”
  • $895,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,464 square feet, 7.71 acres
  • Price/square foot: $363
  • Built in 1910 (per county)
  • Listed May 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $230,000, August 1998
  • Note: The property includes an in-ground saltwater pool, log cabin, 5-plus acres of horse pastures, a barn with a two-car and a shed.
    • The listing gives a 1908 date for the house.

201 Country Club Drive, Greensboro
The Roy and Rosamund Morgan House
Blog post — The Roy and Rosamund Morgan House in Greensboro: 1940’s Home of a Distinguished Lawyer-FBI Agent-Diplomat, $863,000

  • $825,000 (originally $863,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,058 square feet, 0.46 acre
  • Price/square foot: $270
  • Built in 1939 (per county, see note)
  • Listed October 11, 2021
  • Last sale: $427,500, April 1999
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The address doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1942, suggesting a date of 1941 or 1942 for the house.
    • The property was bought in 1940 by Roy Leonard Morgan (1908-1985) and Rosamund Woodruff Morgan (1901-1995); they owned it until 1965. Roy was a special agent with the FBI and a lawyer practicing with Brooks, McLendon and Holderness. He had a remarkable career.
    • “While he was a special agent for the FBI, he represented the U.S. government during the 1942 detention of 1200 Japanese, German and Italian diplomats from North and South America at The Homestead in Hot Springs, Virginia and The Greenbrier, in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia.
    • “In 1946 he went to Tokyo for the War Department to serve as Associate Counsel and Chief of the Investigative Division of the International Prosecution Section (IPS) of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East.” (University of Virginia: The International Military Tribunal for the Far East, Digital Collection)
    • Roy came back to Greensboro, continued practicing law and served on the City Council. In 1950 he went back to Japan to work for Ford Motor Company. Four years later, he went to Germany as a military intelligence analyst for a year.
    • “For the next fifteen years Morgan served in various capacities for the U.S. and Japanese governments. In 1955-1956 he was one of the American advisors to the Prime Minister of Japan, and Chief Justice of the U.S. Civil Administration, Appellate Court for the Far East until 1960.
    • “From 1960 to 1967 he was Special Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce, and consultant of the U.S. government, advisor on international trade with Japan, and in 1962 and 1968, he served as Head of the U.S. Trade Missions to Japan.”
    • He retired to Florida and eventually moved to Mount Airy, where he died in 1985. He and Rosemund are buried in Low Gap.

304 Woodlawn Avenue, Greensboro
listing withdrawn on or before May 16, 2022

  • $729,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,834 square feet (per county), 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $397
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed April 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $429,000, December 2021
  • Neighborhood: Westerwood
  • Note: The listing shows 1,966 square feet.
    • The property includes a two-car detached garage with a second floor.
    • The address first appears in the 1924 city directory, listed as vacant. The property changed hands six times between August 1921 and November 1924, making it difficult to determine exactly who built the house.
    • Alexander C. “Sandy” Forsyth (1869-1940) bought the house in November 1924. He and his wife, Henrietta Clapp Forsyth (1871-1945), owned it until 1944. Sandy, a native of Canada, was a traveling salesman.

1812 Madison Avenue, Greensboro
The Christine and Ray Warren House
sale pending April 4, 2022

  • $725,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 2,700 square feet, 0.29 acre
  • Price/square foot: $278
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed March 31, 2022
  • Last sale: $146,500, May 1986
  • District NRHP nomination: A nearly identical house stands at 1712 Madison Avenue.
    • “The two-story, three-bay, weatherboard Dutch Colonial Revival-style house features a front-gabled hood supported by curved brackets. Beneath its vaulted soffit is a blind fanlight surmounting a paneled wood door with flanking multi-light sidelights.
    • “Windows are six-over-one with shutters pierced by a diamond-motif cutout. A nearly full-width shed dormer, also with six-over-one windows, spans the front roof slope.
    • “A brick chimney rises from the east gable end of the main block and through the flat roof of a one-story wing topped by a metal balustrade. A one-story, gabled ell extends from the rear.
    • “The 1928 city directory lists Mr. Warren as a city highway engineer.”

410 Edgedale Drive, High Point
The Claude J. Cummins House II
sale pending April 12

  • $675,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,756 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $180
  • Built in 1922
  • Listed April 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $361,500, August 2017
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Note: The property includes a garage apartment with a kitchen and bathroom, a garden shed and a fountain in the backyard.
  • District NRHP nomination: “This one-and-a-half-story, clipped-side-gabled, English Cottage-style house is three bays wide and double-pile. The house has a stuccoed exterior, interior stuccoed chimney, and three shed-roofed dormers on the facade.
    • “It has eight-over-one windows flanked by four-over-one windows on the facade and in the center dormer. Other windows are a combination of eight-over-one, six-over-one, and twelve-over-one, wood-sash windows, all with applied wood cornices.
    • “The double-leaf, twelve-light French doors have a blind fanlight and are sheltered by an arch-roofed porch with extensions supported by columns on a slate-covered stoop.
    • “The one-story, flat-roofed porch on the right (east) elevation has been enclosed with glass and there is a hip-roofed ell at the left rear (northwest).”
    • Architectural historian Benjamin Briggs: “… this two-story house resembles an English Cottage illustrated in ‘Gordon-Van Tine Home No. 602,’ a homebuilder’s plan book of the 1920s. … The Cummins House illustrates the national influence on local house styles and is one of many Emerywood houses derived from popular architectural publications of the day.”
    • The first owners were Claude J. Cummins (1874-1957) and Mecca Humphrey Cummins (1881-1958). Both were born in Indiana; they were married in 1901 and came to High Point in 1914. Claude was secretary-treasurer of Carolina Veneer; he later became president. Mecca was a graduate of the Indianapolis Conservatory of Music. The house was sold by Claude’s heirs in 1960.

303 S. Mendenhall Street, Greensboro
The Effie M. Anderson House
Blog post (2020) — 303 S. Mendenhall Street: A 1914 Harry Barton Classic in College Hill, $449,900
listing withdrawn October 21, 2021; relisted March 4, 2022
listing withdrawn March 8, 2022; relisted April 30, 2022
sale pending May 2, 2022

  • $650,000 (originally $575,000, later $699,000)
  • 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,807 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $171
  • Built in 1914
  • Listed October 19, 2021
  • Last sale: $449,900, December 2020
  • Neighborhood: College Hill Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: For sale by owner
    • Designated as a Guilford County historic landmark
    • Designed by Harry Barton. Few architects have been as historically prominent in Greensboro and across the state as Harry Barton. For more than 20 years until his death in 1937, he designed several of the Greensboro’s most notable buildings, including the UNCG Auditorium, the Quad and others on the campus; the Guilford County Courthouse; the Cone Export and Commission Building; First Presbyterian Church and Presbyterian Church of the Covenant; and World War Memorial Stadium. 
    • Effie McLean Anderson (1884-1946) was a widow. She bought the house in 1915, about a year after her husband died; they had been married less than four years. She had no children and never remarried. (Effie did have a step-daughter, Fannie Anderson Sutton, but may not have raised her. Fannie’s mother died at age 30 in 1910, when Fannie was four years old. Fannie lived to be 99, dying in 2006 at her home at Well-Spring Retirement Community.)
    • Effie owned the house until February 9, 1946; she died eight days later at the age of 61.
    • Her husband, William Irvin Anderson (1878-1914), died at age 35 while having his appendix taken out. He was the founder and owner of W.I. Anderson Produce at 245 E. Friendly Avenue. His building has been converted to offices but is still identifiable by the words “♦ FRUITS ♦ PRODUCE ♦” over the door facing East Friendly (click on the photo to see it bigger):

1601 N. College Park Drive, Greensboro
The Cox-Ellinwood House
sale pending April 14, 2022

  • $637,500
  • 4 bedrooms 3 bathrooms, 3,092 square feet (per county), 0.52 acre
  • Price/square foot: $206
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed April 5, 2022
  • Last sale: $345,000, July 1995
  • Neighborhood: College Park
  • Note: The listing shows 3,271 square feet.
    • The property was sold three times in less than 18 months in 1924-25, around the time the house was built. The first owners who lived in the house appear to have been Grover Cleveland Cox (1885-1944) and Mabel Clarice Causey Cox (1896-1928). Grover was secretary-treasurer of Gate City Motors, which sold Chrysler cars and Firestone tires. The house was sold after his death in 1944.
    • In 1949, Dr. Everett Hews Ellinwood (1901-1969) and Hulda Eggleston Holloman Ellinwood (1901-1993) bought the house and owned it for 44 years. Everett was the county health director. In 1950 he declared a ordered a quarantine of dogs because of an outbreak of rabies. In one month, 22 people were bitten by rabid animals; eight dogs were found to be rabid. After his death in 1969, Hulda owned the house until her death in 1993.

1101 Virginia Street, Greensboro
sale pending May 9, 2022

  • $629,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,254 square feet, 0.31 acre
  • Price/square foot: $279
  • Built in 1913
  • Listed May 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $550,000, March 2021
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: “meticulously restored”
    • The property includes an outdoor fireplace, outbuilding and hot tub.
    • District NRHP nomination: “Germain Revival: Clipped gables extend over 2nd-story windows, both of which have a flower box with rounded supports that match the exposed eaves of the main hipped roof; gabled portico has upturned eaves & a rounded arch supported by 2 battered posts; windows are in groups with small multi-paned upper sash.”
    • The original owners appear to have been cotton broker Robert L. Thompson and Anne Busbee Thompson. he original address appears to have been 300 W. Bessemer Avenue, an address that no longer exists. They sold the house in 1919 to Grover Cleveland Cox (1885-1944) and Mable C. Cox (1896-1928). Grover was secretary-treasurer of Gate City Motor Company, the local dealer for Oldsmobile, Chalmers, Cole and Overland cars.

1108 Ferndale Boulevard, High Point

  • $525,000 (originally $550,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,443 square feet, 0.69 acre
  • Price/square foot: $152
  • Built in 1936
  • Listed May 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $305,000, December 1999
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Note: Vinyl siding

310 W. Bessemer Avenue, Greensboro
The Bradshaw-Gilbert House
sale pending April 11, 2022

  • $475,000 (originally $499,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,426 square feet, 0.28 acre
  • Price/square foot: $196
  • Built in 1915
  • Listed March 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $329,000, December 0218
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: The property includes a detached two-car garage.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival. Gambrel-roof; stone-veneered first floor, shingled above; projecting front porch with trellis, supported by stone piers; shed dormer across front.”
    • The original owners were Jesse Graham Bradshaw (1883-1928) and Pattie Clendenin Bradshaw (1884-1932), who bought the property in 1919 from the James E. Latham Company, the area’s developer. The address first appeared in the city directory in 1920. Bradshaw was in real estate. The Bradshaws sold the house in 1922. They bought and operated the Moore’s Spring Resort in Stokes County. Unfortunately, the hotel burned in 1925. Jesse’s cause of death in 1928 was listed as “cerebral apoplexy,” presumably a stroke.
    • David N. Gilbert and Connie H. Gilbert bought the house from the Bradshaws. David was co-proprietor of Mullen & Gilbert, cotton brokers. They owned the house until 1944.

335 Gorrell Street, Greensboro
sale pending April 24, 2022

  • $399,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,152 square feet (per county), 0.14 acre
  • Price/square foot: $186
  • Built in 2005
  • Listed April 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $350,000, February 2021
  • Neighborhood: Southside
  • Note: Designed to complement existing historic homes in the redeveloped Southside neighborhood.
    • The property includes a detached 2-car garage with an attic accessed by pull-down stairs.

Winston-Salem and Forsyth County

828 Oaklawn Avenue, Winston-Salem

  • $835,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,395 square feet, 0.35 acre
  • Price/square foot: $246
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $583,000, June 2015
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
  • Note: The property includes a two-car detached carport.

465 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston Salem

  • $489,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,747 square feet, 0.24 acre
  • Price/square foot: $178
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $338,000, September 2017
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Dutch Colonial Revival. One and a half story; side gambrel; shed-roof dormer sheathed in weatherboard; brick lower level; six-over-one, double-hung sash; gable-roof entry porch with barrel vault opening; fluted columns; side porch with roof balustrade; side porch.”

625 Miller Street, Winston-Salem
The Roland and Gertrude Early House
sale pending May 3, 2022

  • $425,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,732 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $245
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed April 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $269,000, December 2016
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Foursquare. Two story; hip roof; hip-roof dormer; vinyl siding; six-over-one, double-hung sash and six and two-light transoms-over-one windows with vertical upper lights; wrap around porch/porte-cochere; Tuscan columns; sidelights.”
    • The address first appears in the city directory in 1928 with Roland Blackwell Early (1878-1951) and Eugenia Gertrude Holman Early (1875-1954) as residents. Roland was a construction foreman for R.J. Reynolds.

4798 Pfaff Lane, Pfafftown, Forsyth County
The John Henry Pfaff House

  • $339,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,641 square feet, 0.58 acre
  • Price/square foot: $129
  • Built in 1904 (per county property records)
  • Listed May 19, 2022
  • Last sale: $166,500, February 1997
  • Note: Forsyth County Historic Landmark, qualifying for a property-tax reduction of up to 50 percent.
    • “It is a fine example of traditional, vernacular houses built in the Piedmont during the early 20th century,” the county’s description of the house says. “It is a two-story frame dwelling with an L-shaped configuration and Colonial Revival detailing. The house features a brick foundation and weatherboard siding.
    • “The gabled roof is pierced by interior brick chimneys. A one-story, gable-roof rear ell projects westward from the northwest corner of the house. The windows are two-over-two sash, and most have the original wood louvered shutters.
    • “On the front façade of the house, a shed-roof porch supported by Tuscan columns covers the three-bay façade and wraps around the projecting left front wing. The central entrance is composed of a pair of glass-and-wood paneled doors.
    • “At the southwest corner of the property stands a frame granary that was probably constructed around the same time as the house.”
    • John Henry Pfaff (1858-1949) was the great grandson of Peter Pfaff (1724-1804), the town’s namesake. After working in stores in Winston-Salem and Bethania, John Henry came home and opened a store of his own in 1891. It operated until 1972 at the corner of Yadkinville Road and Pfaff Lane.
    • “Pfaff’s store sold groceries, general merchandise, sewing machines, watches and clocks, gasoline, Goodyear tires, Ford automobile parts, and Johnson Harvester machinery, such as reapers, mowing machines, hay rakes, and plows. Highly esteemed in the community and known for his benevolent spirit and deeds, Pfaff operated his store until the mid 1940s, a few years before his death” at age 91.
    • Late in life, he was faced with choosing between two daughters, who didn’t get along, to inherit the house. Brilliantly, he left it to his sons to decide after his death. It would be interesting to know how the brothers felt about their sisters; from their Solomon-like decision, it’s impossible to tell.
    • “They had the property resurveyed, with a dividing line running through the center hall of the house. Louise received the portion of the house located north of the line, while Anna received the part south of the line.” How well the arrangement suited the sisters isn’t documented, but it lasted for 34 years, until both died in 1983.
    • The property was left to Louise’s children (Anna was unmarried). In 1988, they sold it to new owners who restored it.

4203 S. Main Street, Winston-Salem
sale pending April 14 to May 10, 2022
sale pending May 14, 2022

  • $285,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,927 square feet, 1.48 acres
  • Price/square foot: $97
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed April 8, 2022
  • Last sale: $88,000, August 1997
  • Note: The property includes an in-ground swimming pool.

2853 Hope Church Road, Winston-Salem
sale pending December 14, 2021 to January 3, 2022
sale pending March 25, 2022

  • $215,000 (originally $220,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 1,344 square feet, 2.25 acres
  • Price/square foot: $160
  • Built in 1946
  • Listed October 14, 2021
  • Last sale: $65,000, October 2020
  • Neighborhood: South Fork/Muddy Creek

927 Apple Street SW, Winston-Salem

  • $210,000 (originally $229,500)
  • 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,130 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $99
  • Built in 1885
  • Listed April 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $142,500, February 2021
  • Neighborhood: West Salem Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Vinyl siding, replacement windows
    • The house is next-door to the 1-acre-plus Apple & Green City Farm and just around the corner from Carolina University (formerly Piedmont International University, 2012-20, and Piedmont Bible Institute, 1946-2012).
    • District NRHP nomination: “I-house. Two story; side gable; single pile; rear ell; one-over-one replacement windows; vinyl siding; hip-roof porch; turned posts; sawn brackets. Appears on 1917 Sanborn map.”

150 Acadia Avenue, Winston-Salem
The William and Lillian Forcum House
sale pending May 15, 2022

  • $150,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,680 square feet, 0.13 acre
  • Price/square foot: $89
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed May 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $100,000, June 2019
  • Neighborhood: Washington Park Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Narrow gable-front frame house with shed-roofed porch supported by replacement ‘wrought iron’ posts.
    • “Paired 6/1 window centered in second floor front facade. Side shed ell. Vinyl siding, vinyl shutters and vinyl at soffits.
    • “Forcum (wife Lillian) was a driver for Quality Cleaners.” Forcum (1900-2002) had two wives, both named Ruby (Ruby Lillian Hooker Forcum, 1905-1973, and Ruby Magalena Kiser Anderson Forcum, 1915-2009).

1119 N. Cameron Avenue, Winston-Salem
The James and Flavella Penn House
sale pending April 15-28, 2022
sale pending May 2, 2022

  • $129,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,894 square feet, 0.13 acre
  • Price/square foot: $68
  • Built in 1940 (per county, probably at least a couple years earlier)
  • Listed April 14, 2022
  • Last sale: $63,000, August 1999
  • Neighborhood: East Winston-Salem near 14th Street Park
  • Note: The first homeowners were James Vance Penn (1887-1957) and Flavella Carter Penn (1891-1974). James was a porter for W.T. Vogler & Son, jewelers, watchmakers and silversmiths. They were first listed at the address in 1938; Flavella was listed as late as 1963.

Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties

283 S. N.C. Highway 62, Yanceyville, Caswell County
listing withdrawn February 5, 2022; relisted February 7, 2022
listing withdrawn April 11, 2022
relisted April 12, 2022

  • $584,900 (originally $629,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,025 square feet, 2.22 acres
  • Price/square foot: $193
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed April 14, 2021
  • Last sale: $133,000, May 2003
  • Note: The property includes a guest house, 688 square feet.
    • The house is immediately south of Bartlett Yancey High School.

1011 Center Church Road, Eden, Rockingham County
The Johns Manor House (also known as the Johns-Osborne House)
sale pending April 4, 2022

  • $395,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,970 square feet (per county), 2.55 acres (per county)
  • Price/square foot: $99
  • Built in 1840 (sometimes listed as 1850)
  • Listed June 18, 2019
  • Last sale: $366,500, August 2021
  • Note: Designated as a historic landmark by the Eden Historic Preservation Commission
    • The house was built by Dr. Anthony Bennings Johns Sr. (1800-1874), one of the first physicians in Leaksville. It originally was a two-story brick farmhouse.
    • Epitaph: “In the comfort of a reasonable, religious and holy hope.””
    • The family called it Bleak House.
    • Dr. Johns left the house to his daughter Annie Eliza Johns (1831-1889). Annie was a nurse during the Civil War and a poet. Her novel, Cooleemee, a Tale of Southern Life, was published in 1882. It is available to be read online through the Library of Congress.
    • Epitaph: “Asleep in Jesus” (guessing on the last word, which isn’t very legible)
    • Annie gave the house to her brother, Dr. Anthony Bennings Johns Jr. (1835-1915). He was an 1857 graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. His thesis was titled, “The Diseases of Rockingham County, N.C.”
    • During the Civil War, Anthony rose to the rank of captain in the infantry before becoming an army doctor in 1863. He was left behind after the Battle of Gettysburg to care for the wounded. He was taken prisoner, but within three months he was back with the 45th N.C. Infantry as assistant surgeon. In early 1864 he resigned his commission due to ill health (anemia and diarrhea), apparently resulting from his time as a prisoner of war. After the war he practiced in Leaksville with his father.
    • Epitaph: “Mark the perfect man and behold the upright for the end of that man is peace. Psm 37:87”
    • Around 1950, the house was bought by Douglas Floyd Osborne (1910-1974), an attorney and mayor of Leaksville. His family continued to own it until 2009.
    • The property has been used as an event center in the past.
    • City ordinance designating the house as a historic landmark: “The original house was a large brick, one-room-deep, two-story structure with a rear two-story ell. …
    • “The main house was enlarged in the late 19th or early 20th century with a two-story addition behind the original structure.
    • “In the mid-20th century, a one-story wing over a basement was added on the rear and east side of the main house. A wide two-story portico with square columns was also added sometime in the 20th century, giving the home a ‘Mount Vernon’ style appearance.”

403 S. 2nd Avenue, Mayodan, Rockingham County

  • $389,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet, 0.80 acre
  • Price/square foot: $141
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $265,000, March 2021
  • Neighborhood: Washington Mills
  • Note: Renovations have added cheap vinyl siding and replacement windows.
    • The property has two outbuildings.
    • Washington Mills, less than a block away, originally owned the house. The company sold it to private owners in 1964. The listing says the house had been the home of the company president. The plant opened in 1896 as Mayo Mills.

6723 Whitney Road, Eli Whitney community, Alamance County
sale pending May 2, 2022

  • $375,000
  • 4 bedrooms and 1 bathroom (per county), 2,238 square feet, 5 acres
  • Price/square foot: $168
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed April 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $93,000, August 1987
  • Note: The property has a Graham mailing address. It’s located on Mary’s Creek.
    • The listing shows 3 bedrooms and 3 1/2 bathrooms.
819 washington street eden 2.jpg

819 Washington Street, Eden, Rockingham County
The J.W. Hopper House
Blog post — The Best Example of Tudor Revival in Eden’s Central Leaksville Historic District, $245,000
listing expired September 5, 2019; relisted November 3, 2021
sale pending February 8 to March 8, 2022
sale pending April 7, 2022

  • $245,000 (originally $215,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 3,941 square feet, 0.31 acre
  • Price/square foot: $62
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed January 5, 2018
  • Last sale: $35,000, February 1973
  • Neighborhood: Central Leaksville Historic District (NRHP)
  • Listing: “Paint allowance for exterior with acceptable offer. Sold As-Is.”
    • Previous listing: “Hardwoods under all carpet.”
    • The air conditioning appears to consist of mini-split systems throughout the house.
    • Out-of-state owner
    • District NRHP nomination: “The best example of the Tudor Revival style is the J.W. Hopper House located at 819 Washington Street (#98). Around 1920, James W. Hopper (1888-1965) Leaksville’s foremost architect, designed this academic rendition of the style for his family.
    • “The large two-and-one-half story house features the characteristic elements of applied half-timbering on rough stucco on the second story, brick first story, prominent gabled wings, and bands of multi-pane casement windows.”
    • “Careful exterior detailing includes soldier courses of brick above the first-story windows and just below the second-story windows and carved raking boards with brackets in all of the gables.
    • “This attention to detail continues on the interior where all of the trim, including deep crown molding, and all of the doors, which are the vertical two-panel type, are stained.
    • “Except for the tile floor in the solarium at the southeast corner of the house (which has been converted to a library with walnut paneling and shelves lining the walls), all of the floors are white oak.
    • “In the living room, tall walnut wainscoting rises to rough plaster walls and exposed beams highlight the ceiling.”

501 Short Street, Haw River, Alamance County
sale pending April 21, 2022

  • $182,999
  • 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,516 square feet, 0.15 acre
  • Price/square foot: $121
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed April 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $87,000, May 2016
  • Note: Mill house built by Cone Mills
    • The listing shows only 1,255 square feet.

Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties

1948 Farmington Road, Farmington, Davie County
The Charles F. and Jane A. Bahnson House
sale pending April 6, 2022

  • $539,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,364 square feet and 6.1 acres (both per county records)
  • Price/square foot: $160
  • Built circa 1878
  • Listed March 31, 2022
  • Last sale: $474,900, May 2021
  • Neighborhood: Farmington Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: The property has a Mocksville mailing address. Farmington is 9 miles north of Mocksville and 9 miles west of Clemmons.
    • The listing shows 3,700 square feet, a bit larger than county records say.
    • The property includes a barn and two tractor sheds.
    • Listing: “There is also a detached workshop with electricity that could be turned into living space.”
    • NRHP district nomination: “This I-house features a projecting, full-height, gabled central entrance bay with a double-leaf door and a hip-roofed front porch with a gable over the entrance.
    • “Turned porch posts have replaced the original square, bracketed posts and a square vent now pierces the front gable in place of the original decorative gable vent, but the house retains Italianate-style elements such as the heavy sawn work brackets that ornament the boxed cornices and the original two-over-two sash that illuminate the interior.
    • “A bay window projects from the north elevation’s first story, and a bracketed flat-roofed hood shelters the south elevation’s first-story window. Six-over-six sash light the attic. A standing-seam metal roof protects the house.
    • “The rear ell consists of two small gabled sections. The two-room western section is slightly taller and has a central brick chimney and a bay window on the north elevation.
    • “The shed-roofed porch on the south elevation has been enclosed to create a sun porch.
    • “According to family tradition, the ell’s east end was originally a detached kitchen and has been remodeled to serve the same function.
    • “A small room in the southeast corner, which served as a pantry, has been converted into a laundry room, while the adjacent room, originally a meat storage closet, is now a bathroom. The shed-roofed porch on the south elevation has been enclosed to serve as a garage.
    • “The interior retains original plaster walls, tall baseboards, plaster ceilings, and a stair with a turned newel post, turned balusters, and a molded handrail that rises from the center hall’s east end to a landing above the front door.
    • “As in several other Farmington dwellings, plaster arches frame the recesses on either side of the chimney and the bay window in the northwest room, which served as the parlor. The parlor and south second-floor bedroom mantels feature circular medallions incised from the central panels. …
    • “Molded trim surrounds the windows and original two-raised-vertical-panel doors. Two-light transoms surmount each door that leads into a hall.
    • “Electric light fixtures, probably installed about the time Farmington received electric service in 1921, remain in several principal rooms. The brass chandeliers in the dining room and hall were removed from Farmington Methodist Church when the interior was updated in the late 1980s.
    • “Carpeting covers the original wide cypress floors in the halls and bedrooms. Central plaster medallions ornament the parlor and dining room ceilings. The south second-floor bedroom ceiling features decorative plaster work in each corner.”
    • “Charles Frederic Bahnson (1840-1911) and his wife Jane Amanda Johnson (1842-1926), known as Jennie, erected the two-story main block after inheriting money from his mother’s uncle Israel George Loesch’s estate in 1878, but the one-story ell is older. Jennie’s parents, George Wesley and Martha Williams Taylor Johnson, gave the couple land in Farmington that included two small houses (formerly slave quarters according to oral tradition) at the time of their marriage on December 6, 1865. The Bahnsons initially resided on Johnson family property (which is now Tanglewood Park), but moved to Farmington and joined the two existing dwellings to create their home, which they occupied in August 1867.”
    • “The young couple established a successful farm on the land her parents gave them in Farmington, and Charles opened a small office and jewelry shop in a one-room building adjacent to their home. He also traveled throughout the region offering watch repair and optometry services in county seats on court days.”
625 n. main street mount airy.jpg

625 N. Main Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
The Galloway-Lovill House
listing expired November 30, 2018; relisted August 20, 2021
sale pending April 21, 2022

  • $525,000 (originally listed at $465,000, later as low as $440,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 4,238 square feet, 0.46 acre
  • Price/square foot: $124
  • Built in 1903
  • Listed May 3, 2018
  • Last sale: $66,500, August 1989
  • Neighborhood: Mount Airy Historic District (NRHP)
  • Listing: “Pre-Qualified Buyers Only!”
    • Property includes an outbuilding with electricity, water and heat.
    • District NRHP nomination: “Substantial two-and-one-half story frame Colonial Revival style house with high hipped roof, hipped dormers, wrap-around porch and wide molded frieze carried by tapered box posts, molded corner boards, one-over-one windows, and a well-defined Colonial Revival interior.
    • “The unaltered house is sheathed with German siding and the dormers are ornamented with sawn shingles. The elaborate entrance surround features Doric pilasters set on paneled wooden plinths, projecting corner blocks and a heavily molded lintel.
    • “The house was built by Harry Galloway during the first decade of the 20th century, but owned by the James Lovill family for more than half a century.”
    • James Walter Lovill (1880-1963) was president of G.C. Lovill Company, a wholesale grocer, and vice president of the Mount Airy Produce Exchange, of which his brother, Grover Cleveland Lovill, was president. James also was vice president of the Mount Airy Granite Cutting Company and Mount Airy Knit Company. He operated a tobacco warehouse as well.

1544 E. Pine Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
sale pending January 21 to March 23, 2022
sale pending April 9, 2022

  • $259,000 (originally $265,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,607 square feet, 1.69 acres
  • Price/square foot: $100
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed January 12, 2022
  • Last sale: $150,000, March 2021
  • Listing : “Partially Remodeled … Selling As-Is.”

1017 Tom Shelton Road, Sandy Ridge, Stokes County
sale pending April 30, 2022

  • $134,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2,184 square feet, 8.39 acres
  • Price/square foot: $62
  • Built in 1883
  • Listed April 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $65,500, April 2005
  • Listing: Bathroom renovations, including a whirlpool tub, are unfinished.

Chatham, Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

116 E. Naomi Street, Randleman, Randolph County

  • $365,000 (originally $450,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom, 2,330 square feet, 1.2 acres
  • Price/square foot: $157
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed February 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $45,000, October 1988
  • Note: Vinyl siding

609 Oliver Street, Ramseur, Randolph County
sale pending February 2 to March 24, 2021
listing withdrawn April 1, 2021
relisted March 5, 2022

  • $269,900 (originally $235,000, later $275,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,680 square feet (per county), 0.9 acre
  • Price/square foot: $161
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed August 7, 2020
  • Last sale: $73,500, February 2002
  • Note: The property includes two rentals, one over the garage (two bedrooms and one bathroom) and a double-wide (three bedrooms and two bathrooms). A previous listing said both were rented for $500/month.

5250 Siler City-Snow Camp Road, Siler City, Chatham County

  • $249,000 (originally $259,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 3,493 square feet, 2 acres
  • Price/square foot: $71
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed April 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $165,000, April 2021
  • Note: The property includes a barn.