Historic Houses

Updated July 4, 2022

The most historic, notable and distinctive classic houses now for sale in the Triad

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Featured Listing
Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties
Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties
Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

Recent Sales

119 Sealy Drive, Trinity
Trinity Grange 794
sale pending June 8-9, 2022
sale pending June 11, 2022

  • $149,900
  • 0 bedrooms, 2 half-bathrooms, 2,069 square feet, 1.3 acres
  • Price/square foot: $72
  • Built in 1940
  • Listed May 27, 2022
  • Last sale: The property hasn’t been sold since the building was constructed.
  • Listing: “Many possibilities, most of which would require re-zoning.”
    • It’s not a house, but it could be (zoned residential). The building was the home of Trinity Grange 794. It consists of a very large room, an office and a kitchen.
    • From Wikipedia: “The Grange, officially named The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, is a social organization in the United States that encourages families to band together to promote the economic and political well-being of the community and agriculture.[1] The Grange, founded after the Civil War in 1867, is the oldest American agricultural advocacy group with a national scope. The Grange actively lobbied state legislatures and Congress for political goals, such as the Granger Laws to lower rates charged by railroads, and rural free mail delivery by the Post Office.”

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County

300 Wentworth Drive, Greensboro
The Leslie and Alyce Lane House
sale pending May 25, 2022

  • $1.275 million
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,563 square feet (per county), 0.48 acre
  • Price/square foot: $358
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed April 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $812,000, December 2005
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The first owners were Leslie Clute Lane (1885-1967) and Alyce Nealon Lane (1882-1966). Leslie was a traveling salesman. They bought the property in 1924 and lived in the house from 1926 to 1941.

2309 Lafayette Avenue, Greensboro
Blog post on Greensboro Historic Homes — Two Million-Dollar Mansions Sell Suddenly in Irving Park, But You Still Have a Few to Choose From
listing withdrawn December 19, 2021; relisted January 31, 2022
sale pending March 23, 2022

  • $999,000 (originally $1.049 million)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,002 square feet, 0.66 acre
  • Price/square foot: $333
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed July 13, 2020
  • Last sale: $550,000, March 2003
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Listing: The property includes a detached 1,600 square-foot “guest house/garage/rec room/office” with two bathrooms. Also “Moss walkways, Blue Stone patios & Koi Pond.”
    • From 1924 to 1930, the property was sold five times. In 1930, it was bought by its first long-term owner, surgeon Richard B. Davis. He owned the house until 1945.
    • Hampton Shuping, an executive with J.P. Stevens and his wife, Margaret, owned the house from 1958 to 1982. Stevens may be best remembered today as the bitterly anti-union textile company that served as the villain in the film Norma Rae. Stevens’s resistance to unionization was characterized by The New York Times in 1981 as “one of the ugliest episodes in recent labor history.”

202 Fisher Park Circle, Greensboro
The John Walker Fry House
sale pending June 6, 2022

  • $985,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,474 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $284
  • Built in 1938 (per county, but certainly earlier; see note)
  • Listed June 4, 2022
  • Last sale: $685,000, November 2017
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District
  • Note: The city directory lists John Walker Fry as residing at this address by 1917, when the street was still called Park Place. The district’s National Register nomination dates it to 1915-1920.
    • Greensboro, An Architectural Record: “The retrained finish of this large four-square includes a simple Doric portico and a wide, overhanging, bellcast hipped roof and front dormer underpinned with exposed rafter ends.”
    • Fry (1854-1938) was chairman of Greensboro Bank & Trust Company, vice president of Greensboro Insurance & Realty Company, and president of Coveland Orchards.
    • By 1931, the house was occupied by twice-widowed John along with his third wife, and his nephew Fielding Lewis Fry (1892-1961) and wife Fannie Sommerville Williams Fry (1895-1983). Fielding was president of Fry & Stevens, an insurance agency (later Fielding L. Fry & Company). He served as mayor of Greensboro 1947-1949 and as chairman of Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina.
    • The Depression played no favorites, and in 1932, John lost the house to foreclosure. He and his wife moved to a rented house at 665 Chestnut Street in Dunleath, where he lived until he died in 1938.
    • Fielding and Fannie continued to live at 202 Fisher Park until around 1937, when they moved to 227 Fisher Park Circle.
    • The house was then occupied by Sidney Broaddus Allen (1897-1976) and his wife, Jessie Brandt Allen (1903-1980). Allen had been one of the two trustees who had foreclosed on the house. He was president of Greensboro Mortgage Company, Greensboro Investment Company and Tatum-Allen Coal Company. He bought the house out of foreclosure in 1943 and sold it in 1946.

604 Scott Avenue, Greensboro
The Chapman and Frances Harbour House
listing withdrawn on or before June 22, 2022

  • $899,900
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,954 square feet, 0.83 acre
  • Price/square foot: $305
  • Built in 1917
  • Listed June 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $145,000, February 2021 (apparently wasn’t listed in MLS)
  • Neighborhood: Lindley Park
  • Note: The price is spectacularly high for Lindley Park, which has been one of the more affordable older neighborhoods in Greensboro.
    • The original owners were Chapman Lee Harbour (1874-1951) and Frances Terry Harbour (1882-1958). Chapman was an inspector for South Atlantic Lumber Company. Later, he was a nurseryman in Colfax and lived in Asheboro.
    • Both came from large families in Patrick County, Virginia. Chapman was the first of 10 children, all but one of whom lived to adulthood (siblings: John, Starling, Victoria, Mary, Dovie, Exony, Zachary, William and Martha).
    • Frances was the 12th of 13 children. At least two died in childhood; two others lived to be 99 (she had eight siblings and four half-siblings: Julia, John, Samuel, Mary, Sarah, Ulysses Grant, Henry, James Madison, Joseph, Murray, William, and Carrie).
    • The Harbours sold the house in 1931 to George W. Brown (1866-1953) and Amelia Vandergriff Brown (1878-1949). They owned it until their deaths. Originally from Tennessee, they had been married since 1895. George was a superintendent and later a paving contractor, an occupation he took up at age 70 (according to the city directory).
    • In 1962 the house was sold to John Frank Yeattes Sr. (1890-1968) and Carrie R. Jobe Yeattes (1895-1994). Their family used the house as a rental and owned it for 59 years, until it was sold in 2021 for renovation. John was assistant clerk of Superior Court. Their son, John Frank Yeattes Jr. (1922-2010), was later a District Court judge in Guilford County.
    • How the house looked when it was sold in 2021:
  • $895,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,464 square feet, 7.71 acres
  • Price/square foot: $363
  • Built in 1910 (per county)
  • Listed May 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $230,000, August 1998
  • Note: The property includes an in-ground saltwater pool, log cabin, 5-plus acres of horse pastures, a barn with a two-car and a shed.
    • The listing gives a 1908 date for the house.

201 Country Club Drive, Greensboro
The Roy and Rosamund Morgan House
Blog post — The Roy and Rosamund Morgan House in Greensboro: 1940’s Home of a Distinguished Lawyer-FBI Agent-Diplomat, $863,000
listing withdrawn June 7, 2022

  • $825,000 (originally $863,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,058 square feet, 0.46 acre
  • Price/square foot: $270
  • Built in 1939 (per county, see note)
  • Listed October 11, 2021
  • Last sale: $427,500, April 1999
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The address doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1942, suggesting a date of 1941 or 1942 for the house.
    • The property was bought in 1940 by Roy Leonard Morgan (1908-1985) and Rosamund Woodruff Morgan (1901-1995); they owned it until 1965. Roy was a special agent with the FBI and a lawyer practicing with Brooks, McLendon and Holderness. He had a remarkable career.
    • “While he was a special agent for the FBI, he represented the U.S. government during the 1942 detention of 1200 Japanese, German and Italian diplomats from North and South America at The Homestead in Hot Springs, Virginia and The Greenbrier, in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia.
    • “In 1946 he went to Tokyo for the War Department to serve as Associate Counsel and Chief of the Investigative Division of the International Prosecution Section (IPS) of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East.” (University of Virginia: The International Military Tribunal for the Far East, Digital Collection)
    • Roy came back to Greensboro, continued practicing law and served on the City Council. In 1950 he went back to Japan to work for Ford Motor Company. Four years later, he went to Germany as a military intelligence analyst for a year.
    • “For the next fifteen years Morgan served in various capacities for the U.S. and Japanese governments. In 1955-1956 he was one of the American advisors to the Prime Minister of Japan, and Chief Justice of the U.S. Civil Administration, Appellate Court for the Far East until 1960.
    • “From 1960 to 1967 he was Special Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce, and consultant of the U.S. government, advisor on international trade with Japan, and in 1962 and 1968, he served as Head of the U.S. Trade Missions to Japan.”
    • He retired to Florida and eventually moved to Mount Airy, where he died in 1985. He and Rosemund are buried in Low Gap.

506 Woodland Drive, Greensboro
The Alex and Margaret Stockton House
sale pending June 22, 2022

  • $639,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,361 square feet, 0.29 acre
  • Price/square feet: $271
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed June 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, December 1989
  • Neighborhood: Latham Park
  • Listing: The property includes a guest house/office with a full bathroom and a fireplace that was originally used for cooking.
    • The original owners were Margaret and Alex Stockton, who bought the property from the J.A. Latham Co. in 1927. Alexander Lowrie Stockton (1876-1934) was managing editor of the Greensboro Daily News and vice president of the Greensboro News Co. and North State Engraving Co. Margaret R. Chambers Stockton (1881-1954) continued to live in the house after Alex’s death at age 58, selling it in 1940.

1101 Virginia Street, Greensboro
sale pending May 9, 2022

  • $629,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,254 square feet, 0.31 acre
  • Price/square foot: $279
  • Built in 1913
  • Listed May 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $550,000, March 2021
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: “meticulously restored”
    • The property includes an outdoor fireplace, outbuilding and hot tub.
    • District NRHP nomination: “Germain Revival: Clipped gables extend over 2nd-story windows, both of which have a flower box with rounded supports that match the exposed eaves of the main hipped roof; gabled portico has upturned eaves & a rounded arch supported by 2 battered posts; windows are in groups with small multi-paned upper sash.”
    • The original owners appear to have been cotton broker Robert L. Thompson and Anne Busbee Thompson. he original address appears to have been 300 W. Bessemer Avenue, an address that no longer exists. They sold the house in 1919 to Grover Cleveland Cox (1885-1944) and Mable C. Cox (1896-1928). Grover was secretary-treasurer of Gate City Motor Company, the local dealer for Oldsmobile, Chalmers, Cole and Overland cars.

1108 Ferndale Boulevard, High Point

  • $520,000 (originally $550,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,443 square feet, 0.69 acre
  • Price/square foot: $151
  • Built in 1936
  • Listed May 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $305,000, December 1999
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Note: Vinyl siding

1014 Country Club Drive, High Point
The James A. Myatt House

  • $500,000 (originally $515,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,969 square feet, 0.39 acre
  • Price/square foot: $168
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed June 2, 2022
  • Last sale: $110,000, August 1985
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood, Uptown Suburbs Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “This one-story, side-gabled, Tudor Revival-style house is three bays wide and double-pile with a steeply pitched, asphalt-shingled roof with flared eaves and a projecting, front-gabled wing on the right (south) end of the facade.
    • “The house has a stuccoed exterior with brick detailing and faux half-timbering in the gables. The leaded-glass, diamond-paned casement windows have rough-hewn lintels. There is brick detailing at the entrance and a batten door with leaded-glass light.
    • “A two-story, shed-roofed wing at the rear has batten sheating. There is a decorative brick chimney in the left (north) gable, a one-story, side-gabled, batten wing on the left elevation, and an attached, side-gabled, screened porch to its left.
    • “A low, brick retaining wall extends along the sidewalk.
    • “The earliest known occupant is James A. Myatt (attorney; city solicitor) in 1928.”

220 Tate Street, Greensboro

  • $500,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,628 square feet, 0.16 acre
  • Price/square foot: $190
  • Built in 1905
  • Listed June 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $300,000, May 2021
  • Neighborhood: College Hill Historic District
  • Something you don’t see every day: The property owner admits to a zoning violation. “This home is currently being leased as a college rental at $3,125 a month ($625 a bedroom)” Greensboro zoning prohibits renting a singe-family residence to more than four unrelated persons.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Craftsman foursquare, Residence, 1920-25, Oscar F York. Ticket agent, Southern Railway”

1604 N. College Park Drive, Greensboro 
The George O. Fowler House
Blog post — Classic House of the Week: ‘One of Greensboro’s Most Elegant’ Homes In College Park, $749,000 (previous listing)

  • $475,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,372 square feet, 0.58 acres
  • Price/square foot: $141
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed July 3, 2022
  • Last sale: $554,500, May 2022 (included a 0.32-acre lot behind the house facing Mayflower Street)
  • Neighborhood: College Park
  • Note: The property does not include an adjacent lot behind the house on Mayflower Drive.
    • Greensboro: An Architectural Record: “The Fowler House is one of Greensboro’s most elegant. Joining the Mediterranean and Spanish Revival styles, the yellow-brick villa is shaded by an arcade of fluted Doric columns that is topped by a green-tiled pent roof, brackets and a ballustrade.”
    • The original owners were George O. Fowler (1881-1948) and May Patterson Fowler (1884-1980). They bought the property in 1926; May sold it in 1970. George was manager of the Patterson Brothers grocery store, working with brothers, a sister and an uncle of May. He had joined the company by 1905 and in 1907 was listed as one of the proprietors. George and May married in 1912 and were together until his death 36 years later. She outlived him by 32 years but never remarried.

4909 Old Way Road, Browns Summit, Guilford County
Blog post (2018) — Classic House of the Week: A Beautiful 1916 Farmhouse on 4 Acres near Browns Summit
sale pending June 26, 2022

  • $475,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,724 square feet, 3.66 acres
  • Price/square foot: $174
  • Built in 1916 (per county)
  • Listed June 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $283,500, May 2019
  • Note: The listing gives the date of the house as 1925 and shows only 2,445 square feet.
    • The property includes a workshop with electricity, a raised garden with a drainage system, and a two-stall barn.

1300 W. Market Street, Greensboro

  • $399,900 (originally $459,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,872 square feet (per county), 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $139
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed May 26, 2022
  • Last sale: $13,500, June 1966
  • Neighborhood: Westerwood
  • Note: Before its recent renovation, it was one of the most problematic student rentals in the UNCG area (the university is directly across the street).
    • Although it’s advertised as 5 bedrooms, Greensboro zoning prohibits renting to more than four unrelated persons.
    • Out-of-town owner
    • Replacement windows, but the siding and floors are still wood
    • The listing shows only 2,600 square feet.
    • The last time the house was sold, Friendly Avenue was still called Madison Avenue.
    • The property is on a triangular lot, surrounded by student rentals, on a small triangular block squeezed between two major thoroughfares:

3455 McConnell Road, Greensboro

  • $338,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms 2,849 square feet, 1.13 acres
  • Price/square foot: $119
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed July 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $95,000, June 1994
  • Note: The property includes part of a pond shared with a neighboring property.

84 Hillcrest Drive, High Point
The Clyde Farley House
sale pending June 29, 2022
no longer under contract July 1, 2022

  • $332,500 (originally $350,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,038 square feet, 0.18 acre
  • Price/square foot: $163
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed May 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $85,000, April 1998
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood, Uptown Suburbs Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “This two-story, side-gabled, house has Colonial Revival- and Craftsman-style details. The house is two bays wide and double-pile with a one-story, side-gabled wing on the right (south) elevation and a two-story, gabled rear ell.
    • “The house has vinyl siding and six-over-one, wood-sash windows with shutters. The replacement door is sheltered by a front-gabled porch on square columns.
    • “A side-gabled screened porch and porte-cochere on the left (north) elevation are supported by square columns and may be a later addition.
    • “The earliest known occupant is Clyde F. Farley (Farley’s Garage) in 1927.”

508 Piedmont Avenue, Gibsonville, Guilford County
sale pending June 30, 2022

  • $238,500 (originally $240,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 1,872 square feet, 0.89 acre
  • Price/square foot: $127
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: $158,000, February 2018

808 Douglas Street, Greensboro

  • $175,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 1,616 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $108
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed June 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $70,000, June 2021
  • Neighborhood: Douglas Heights
  • Note: Not owner-occupied

Winston-Salem and Forsyth County

828 Oaklawn Avenue, Winston-Salem
sale pending May 23, 2022

  • $835,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,395 square feet, 0.35 acre
  • Price/square foot: $246
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $583,000, June 2015
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
  • Note: The property includes a two-car detached carport.

1188 W. 4th Street, Winston-Salem
The Fulton House-Hinkle Apartments
sale pending June 28, 2022

  • $589,000
  • Divided into four apartments, all about 1,100 square feet; bedrooms and bathrooms not specified; 4,158 square feet total; 0.37 acre
  • Price/square foot: $142
  • Built in 1918
  • Listed June 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $5,000, December 1934
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: The house was divided into apartments in the 1930s.
    • No central air conditioning
    • District NRHP listing: “This is a large two-story frame house of simple Craftsman style influence typical of many built in the 1910s and 1920s, including some in the West End. It is characterized by a low hip roof with widely overhanging eaves and shaped rafter ends, a front hipped dormer, large twelve-over-one sash windows, a broad central entrance with diamond-muntined sidelights and transom, and front and south side shed-roofed porches with tapered paneled posts on brick plinths and a plain balustrade.
    • “The porches are connected by a corner terrace. The recently added vinyl siding does minimum damage to the integrity of the house.
    • “The property was first listed for taxes by Thomas P. and Nannie Fulton in 1914, and in 1916 they were listed in the city directory at this location. Fulton was secretary-treasurer of the J. G. Fulton Tobacco Co. The Fultons occupied the house through the 1920s. In 1934 D.R., T.C., and Rebecca B. Hinkle, who lived next door, purchased the property, and by 1940 it had begun its many years as the Hinkle Apartments.”
    • The house is being sold by the Hinkles’ heirs.

465 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston Salem
sale pending May 24, 2022

  • $489,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,747 square feet, 0.24 acre
  • Price/square foot: $178
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $338,000, September 2017
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Dutch Colonial Revival. One and a half story; side gambrel; shed-roof dormer sheathed in weatherboard; brick lower level; six-over-one, double-hung sash; gable-roof entry porch with barrel vault opening; fluted columns; side porch with roof balustrade; side porch.”

305 Cascade Avenue, Winston-Salem
The Gip Kimball House
sale pending June 9, 2022

  • $479,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,104 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $228
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed June 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, February 2013
  • Neighborhood: Washington Park Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “The Gip I. Kimball House at 305 Cascade is a characteristic hipped-roof foursquare with weatherboarded first floor and shingled second floor. At the front is a full-front hipped-roof porch supported by square posts on shingled piers with a solid shingled porch balustrade. …
    • “Three asymmetrical bays in first floor, two bays of paired windows on second; most windows are vertical 3/1.
    • Weatherboarded first floor, shingled second floor. Corbelled brick interior chimney; one-story rear hipped ell, weatherboarded. …
    • “Kimball and wife Lucille moved here from 410 S. Liberty Street. He had been cashier with N&W Railway; by 1921 he was bookkeeper with Forsyth Chair Co.”

625 Miller Street, Winston-Salem
The Roland and Gertrude Early House
sale pending May 3, 2022

  • $425,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,732 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $245
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed April 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $269,000, December 2016
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Foursquare. Two story; hip roof; hip-roof dormer; vinyl siding; six-over-one, double-hung sash and six and two-light transoms-over-one windows with vertical upper lights; wrap around porch/porte-cochere; Tuscan columns; sidelights.”
    • The address first appears in the city directory in 1928 with Roland Blackwell Early (1878-1951) and Eugenia Gertrude Holman Early (1875-1954) as residents. Roland was a construction foreman for R.J. Reynolds.

1124 West End Boulevard, Winston-Salem
The Miller-Hancock House
listing expired December 19, 2018
relisted May 20, 2022

  • $379,999 (originally listed at $249,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,545 square feet (per county), 0.22 acre
  • Price/square foot: $149
  • Built in 1911
  • Listed July 9, 2018
  • Last sale: $151,500, July 2007
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District
  • Note: For sale by owner
    • Rental property
    • District NRHP nomination: “This Colonial Revival cottage is a one-and-a-half-story weatherboarded frame house with a clipped gable roof.
      • It features a hipped front dormer, a glass and wood paneled entrance with sidelights, a facade porch with Tuscan columns and a plain balustrade, steep wooden steps to the porch, and a high brick porch foundation with large south-facing windows.
      • “Like many of the houses on the street, it has a stone retaining wall bordering the front yard and stone front steps.
      • “Mary Eva Miller purchased the property in 1910, and the 1917 Sanborn map shows that the house had been built by that time. The 1918 city directory — the first to cover this area of West End Blvd. — lists Paul L. Miller, a contractor, and his wife, Eva, as residing at this location.
      • “They occupied the house through 1935 and sold it to Thomas W. and Alice B. Hancock in 1941.” The Hancocks occupied the house at least until 1975. By 1986 the house was a rental. The family retained ownership of the property until July 2007.

430 E. Sprague Street, Winston-Salem
sale pending May 29, 2022

  • $319,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 1,817 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $176
  • Built in 1901
  • Listed May 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $105,000, January 2022
  • Neighborhood: Sunnyside-Central Terrace Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Four-month turnaround time
    • The listing shows 2,032 square feet, but the write-up doesn’t say anything about an addition being part of the restoration.
    • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story Late Victorian tri-gable with asbestos shingle siding; central projecting bay, shingled gable end; hip-roof porch with chamfered posts, sawn brackets, and spindle frieze; two-over-two windows; single light, three-panel door. Appears on 1917 Sanborn Map.”
    • How it looked when it was sold in January:

8076 Broad Street, Rural Hall, Forsyth County
sale pending June 29, 2022

  • $274,900 (originally $279,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,470 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $111
  • Built in 1891
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: $153,000, February 2016
  • Listing: “The ‘Rev. Smoak House’, this historic home has a fascinating story …” I wonder what it is. The listing doesn’t say, and the house isn’t listed in any of the usual sources. Internet searches turn up nothing, either.

927 Apple Street SW, Winston-Salem
listing withdrawn May 25, 2022

  • $210,000 (originally $229,500)
  • 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,130 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $99
  • Built in 1885
  • Listed April 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $142,500, February 2021
  • Neighborhood: West Salem Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Vinyl siding, replacement windows
    • The house is next-door to the 1-acre-plus Apple & Green City Farm and just around the corner from Carolina University (formerly Piedmont International University, 2012-20, and Piedmont Bible Institute, 1946-2012).
    • District NRHP nomination: “I-house. Two story; side gable; single pile; rear ell; one-over-one replacement windows; vinyl siding; hip-roof porch; turned posts; sawn brackets. Appears on 1917 Sanborn map.”

150 Acadia Avenue, Winston-Salem
The William and Lillian Forcum House
sale pending May 15, 2022

  • $150,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,680 square feet, 0.13 acre
  • Price/square foot: $89
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed May 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $100,000, June 2019
  • Neighborhood: Washington Park Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Narrow gable-front frame house with shed-roofed porch supported by replacement ‘wrought iron’ posts.
    • “Paired 6/1 window centered in second floor front facade. Side shed ell. Vinyl siding, vinyl shutters and vinyl at soffits.
    • “Forcum (wife Lillian) was a driver for Quality Cleaners.” Forcum (1900-2002) had two wives, both named Ruby (Ruby Lillian Hooker Forcum, 1905-1973, and Ruby Magalena Kiser Anderson Forcum, 1915-2009).

Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties

8587 Lindley Mill Road, Snow Camp, Alamance County

  • $975,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,852 square feet, 42 acres
  • Price/square foot: $526
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: 1909 or earlier, price unknown
  • Note: The house may have been built by farmer Amos Julius Richardson (1854-1938). In 1909 ownership passed to two of his children, eight-year-old Arthur Wilbert Richardson (1901-1983) and Daisy Richardson (1884-1971). Arthur’s son Ralph Gray Richardson (1933-2021) inherited the farm in 1983. It being sold by his heirs.
    • Ralph was a graduate of Eli Whitney High School and Burlington Business College. He was beef and chicken farmer and also worked at Western Electric and the UNC-Chapel Hill public safety department. He was an Army veteran of the Korean War.

1734 Lick Fork Creek Road, Ruffin, Rockingham County

  • $689,000 (originally $749,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,806 square feet, 19.75 acres
  • Price/square foot: $267
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed June 10, 2022
  • Last sale: $244,000, September 2002
  • Note: Formerly Pennini Vineyards, which grew vinifera grapes including Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Viogner.
    • The property includes a guest cottage and an in-ground swimming pool.

283 S. N.C. Highway 62, Yanceyville, Caswell County
listing withdrawn February 5, 2022; relisted February 7, 2022
listing withdrawn April 11, 2022
relisted April 12, 2022

  • $580,900 (originally $629,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,025 square feet, 2.22 acres
  • Price/square foot: $192
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed April 14, 2021
  • Last sale: $133,000, May 2003
  • Note: The property includes a guest house, 688 square feet.
    • The house is immediately south of Bartlett Yancey High School.

518 Fountain Place, Burlington, Alamance County
The Atwater-Pyne House
sale pending July 1, 2022

  • $525,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,972 square feet, 0.56 acre
  • Price/square foot: $132
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed June 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $365,000, April 2016
  • Neighborhood: West Davis Street-Fountain Place Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Home of J. Minetree Pyne and Jessie Ormand Pyne from 1963 to 1997 (owned by Alamance County Hospital 1963-1980 and by the Pynes 1980-1997). James Minetree Pyne (1917-1994) served as administrator of Alamance County Hospital from 1956 to 1980. He was a member of the first Alamance County Historical Commission. Preservation Burlington gives an annual award bearing his name to outstanding restorations of historic homes.
    • The property includes a detached three-car garage.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Built ca. 1925 for James Atwater, president of the Alamance Lumber Company, this two-story frame structure exhibits many of the hallmarks of the Colonial Revival style of architecture used for Period Houses of the 1920s and 1930s.
    • “Featuring a three-bay facade, the house has a side gable roof with a simple box cornice and now is clad in aluminum siding. Palladian windows light the attic area from the gable ends, and one-story side wings with flat balustraded roofs create a Georgian configuration.
    • “Single, stepped shoulder brick chimneys rise between the central block and the wings. Eight-over-twelve windows with five-light sidelights flank the classical entrance; the latter has an elliptical fanlight and four-pane sidelights and is sheltered by a gable-roofed single-bay entrance porch with paired Roman Doric columns.
    • “The house is situated at the center of a double lot and faces the fountain for which the street is named.”
    • Atwater (1982-1958) lived in the house until his death. It was sold to Alamance County Hospital after the death of his wife, Lillian Anderson Atwater (1876-1961).

214 Willie Pace Road, Burlington, Alamance County
sale pending June 6, 2022

  • $500,000
  • 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,432 square feet, 18.2 acres
  • Price/square foot: $206
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed May 31, 2022
  • Last sale: $140,000, July 2020
  • Note: The property includes a 1 acre-plus pond, gazebo, detached garages and wired workshops.

590 Parkview Drive, Burlington, Alamance County
sale pending June 6, 2022

  • $400,000 (originally $530,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, 3,186 square feet, 0.27 acre
  • Price/square foot: $126
  • Built in 1937
  • Listed May 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, January 2018
  • Neighborhood: Central Heights Historic District (NRHP study list)

403 S. 2nd Avenue, Mayodan, Rockingham County

  • $369,000 (originally $389,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet, 0.80 acre
  • Price/square foot: $134
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $265,000, March 2021
  • Neighborhood: Washington Mills
  • Note: Renovations have added cheap vinyl siding and replacement windows.
    • The property has two outbuildings.
    • Washington Mills, less than a block away, originally owned the house. The company sold it to private owners in 1964. The listing says the house had been the home of the company president. The plant opened in 1896 as Mayo Mills.

615 Piedmont Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
sale pending, July 3, 2022

  • $349,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,445 square feet, 0.55 acre
  • Price/square foot: $
  • Built in 1922
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $95,000, February 2022
  • Neighborhood: Old Post Road Historic District (local), Reidsville Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: A previous listing said the property included an in-ground pool.
    • Oddly, the historic district’s National Register nomination doesn’t mention the house.

331 Maple Avenue, Reidsville, Rockingham County
The Dr. Samuel G. Jett House

  • $253,000 (originally $255,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3,901 square feet, 0.27 acre
  • Price/square foot: $65
  • Built in 1918
  • Listed June 4, 2022
  • Last sale: $165,000, March 2022
  • Neighborhood: Old Post Road Historic District (local), Reidsville Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Three-month turn-around time for what the listing calls a “Full Home Renovation!”
    • District NRHP nomination: “Built before 1922 for physician and city health officer Dr. Samuel G. Jett, this large and relatively intact bungalow has many distinctive features.
    • “The main body of the square, one and one-half story frame residence is clad in weatherboard siding, while wood shingles cover the gable ends and nearly full-facade shed and gable dormer. Paired casement windows light the dormer, while a variety of nine over one fifteen over one sash and multi-paned casements are found in the rest of the house.
    • “Stuccoed arches spring from heavy brick piers to the engaged porch roof which continues from the side gable roof with its deep bracketed overhang.
    • “The house stands near the front of a typical narrow, but deep, well-shaded lot.”

519 Central Avenue, Burlington, Alamance County

  • $240,000 (originally $250,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,924 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $125
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed June 2, 2022
  • Last sale: $160,000, August 2008
  • Note: The listing describes the house as “move-in ready” but shows no photos of the interior.

101 W. Academy Street, Madison, Rockingham County
The Pratt-Van Noppen House

  • $199,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,350 square feet, 0.36 acre
  • Price/square foot: $85
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $200,000, September 2016
  • Neighborhood: Academy Street Historic District
  • Listing: “Zoned for business and/or residential use.” County tax records describe it as an office building.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story frame T-shaped house with two tall interior brick chimneys.
    • “Distinguishing features are a two-story, three-sided bay in projecting gabled wing of facade, richly carved pendant brackets all along the roofline, and classical details, including Tuscan porch columns and molded architraves topped by boxed heads above doors and windows.
    • “Thomas Ruffin Pratt (1856-1937), prominent local civic and business leader, had the house built during the 1890s. The current [as of 1980] owner is Pratt’s grandson.”
    • Thomas and Maybud Julia Pratt (1861-1932) had at least four children. Ownership of the house apparently passed to the eldest, Annie Pearl Pratt Van Noppen (1886-1968). Her husband, John James Van Noppen II (1871-1919), was a first-generation Dutch American and a dentist in Spray. He died in the Spanish Flu pandemic.
    • Annie was a teacher and contributed articles to Madison’s newspaper, The Messenger, including a series on historic homes along the Dan River in Rockingham County. After John’s death at age 47, she never remarried and outlived him by 49 years.
    • From Thomas’s findagrave.com listing: “Thomas and his brother, Charles Benton Pratt, operated a general merchandise store located in the south half of the Carter-Moir Hardware Store.
    • “The two-story building that housed their general merchandise store is located in the Leaksville Commercial Historic District and is included in the National Register of Historic Places. It is a two-story brick building built in the 1880’s and noted for its decorative brickwork. The building may also have housed the Bank of Leaksville, chartered in 1889.
    • “In the 1890’s Thomas built a two-story T-shaped house at 101 W. Academy Street noted for richly carved brackets and classical details. Thomas also sold insurance. His other business pursuits included a brick manufacturing plant and a mortuary.
    • “He served as a Rockingham County Commissioner and was involved in the infamous story of Rockingham County’s ‘Bridge to Nowhere‘, a bridge built in 1929 across the Dan River with no approaches or connecting roads. Thomas was the chairman of the Rockingham County [Board of Commissioners] when the contract was approved for building the bridge. That resulted in a lengthy and famous lawsuit between the county and the builders, Luten Bridge Company.”
    • In an entertaining academic legal paper, the Luten Bridge/Mebane Bridge case is recounted as “a remarkable story, one that arose within a heated tax revolt pitting the county’s farmers against its most celebrated industrialist. Much more than a crisp illustration of the duty to mitigate, Rockingham County v. The Luten Bridge Co. offers a window into a southern community’s struggles with a divided social order, the introduction of wealth into local politics, and a changing economy.”

527 Barnes Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
sale pending June 5, 2022

  • $194,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 2,032 square feet, 0.45 acre
  • Price/square foot: $96
  • Built in 1909
  • Listed May 30, 2022
  • Last sale: $30,000, November 1995
  • Note: Cheaply renovated with vinyl siding and vinyl replacement windows

939 Galloway Street, Eden, Rockingham County

  • $90,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,714 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $53
  • Built in 1912
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $49,000, September 2016

Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties

414 Will Boone Road, Mocksville, Davie County

  • $539,900 (originally $549,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,318 square feet (per county), 35.83 acres (two tracts)
  • Price/square foot: $233
  • Built in 1903
  • Listed June 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $144,000, August 1999
  • Note: The listing shows 2,482 square feet.
    • “The exterior features a large in-ground saltwater pool possibly in need of a new liner. Numerous storage and outbuildings.”

2139 Quaker Church Road, Siloam, Surry County
sale pending June 6, 2022

  • $399,500
  • 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,857 square feet (per county), 14.27 acres
  • Price/square foot: $215
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed May 30, 2022
  • Last sale: $300,000, December 2020
  • Note: The property includes a 40-by-60 shop with drive-through doors, an office, HVAC, loft storage and concrete floors; a barn with an airplane hanger, wash bays/pits, office, apartment with a kitchenette, full bath and garage.
    • The house has replacement windows and vinyl siding.
    • The listing shows 1,674 square feet.

174 W. Poplar Street, Mount Airy, Surry County

  • $295,000 (originally $320,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $107
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 31, 2022
  • Last sales: $245,000 on September 16, 2021; $196,000, September 2020
  • Neighborhood: Lebanon Hills Historic District
  • Note: The house was previously listed with three bedrooms.
  • District National Register nomination: “A swooping asymmetrical front-gable roof is the defining feature of this two-story Tudor Revival house, which is frame with a textured stucco finish. The swooping part of the roof engages a corner entry porch with segmental-arched openings.
    • “Above is a picturesque segmental-arched casement window; other windows are six-over-one wood sash with a few one-over-one replacement sashes.
    • “At the top of the front and side gables is false half-timbering with cruck (curved) members. Other features include an exterior chimney with sloped shoulders on the east side, asphalt-shingle roofing, a wood panel front door, a modern shed-roofed back porch, and a wall along the east lot line with a granite pillar at the sidewalk.”

1017 Tom Shelton Road, Sandy Ridge, Stokes County
sale pending April 30 to May 23, 2022
sale pending June 30, 2022

  • $134,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2,184 square feet, 8.39 acres
  • Price/square foot: $62
  • Built in 1883
  • Listed April 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $65,500, April 2005
  • Listing: Bathroom renovations, including a whirlpool tub, are unfinished.

Chatham, Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

1130 Fairview Drive, Lexington, Davidson County

  • $599,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,245 square feet, 7.05 acres
  • Price/square foot: $185
  • Built in 1940
  • Listed May 27, 2022
  • Last sale: $155,000, May 2021
  • Note: No information is given regarding the substantial renovations the property must have undergone. However, many rooms appear to have cheap vinyl replacement flooring, there appear to be cheap replacement windows throughout the house, and sloppy brick repairs mar the front. A generator and an air conditioning unit are located at the front of the house, unusual placement for such utilities, especially on such an expensive house.
    • The listing shows 7.52 acres.
    • County records show a second house on the property (3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,553 square feet, built in 1950). That building, if it still exists, isn’t mentioned in the listing or seen in the photos.

116 E. Naomi Street, Randleman, Randolph County

  • $275,000 (originally $450,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom, 2,330 square feet, 1.2 acres
  • Price/square foot: $118
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed February 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $45,000, October 1988
  • Note: Vinyl siding

609 Oliver Street, Ramseur, Randolph County
sale pending February 2 to March 24, 2021
listing withdrawn April 1, 2021
relisted March 5, 2022

  • $269,900 (originally $235,000, later $275,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,680 square feet (per county), 0.9 acre
  • Price/square foot: $161
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed August 7, 2020
  • Last sale: $73,500, February 2002
  • Note: The property includes two rentals, one over the garage (two bedrooms and one bathroom) and a double-wide (three bedrooms and two bathrooms). A previous listing said both were rented for $500/month.

119 Sealy Drive, Trinity
Trinity Grange 794
sale pending June 8, 2022

  • $149,900
  • 0 bedrooms, 2 half-bathrooms, 2,069 square feet, 1.3 acres
  • Price/square foot: $72
  • Built in 1940
  • Listed May 27, 2022
  • Last sale: The property hasn’t been sold since the building was constructed.
  • Listing: “Many possibilities, most of which would require re-zoning.”
    • It’s not a house, but it could be (zoned residential). The building was the home of Trinity Grange 794. It consists of one large room, an office and a kitchen.
    • From Wikipedia: “The Grange, officially named The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, is a social organization in the United States that encourages families to band together to promote the economic and political well-being of the community and agriculture.[1] The Grange, founded after the Civil War in 1867, is the oldest American agricultural advocacy group with a national scope. The Grange actively lobbied state legislatures and Congress for political goals, such as the Granger Laws to lower rates charged by railroads, and rural free mail delivery by the Post Office.”