Historic Houses

Updated February 6, 2023

The most historic, notable and distinctive classic houses now for sale in the Triad

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Featured Listing
Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties
Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties
Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

Recent Sales

304 Woodlawn Avenue, Greensboro
The Alex and Henrietta Forsythe House
listing withdrawn May 16, 2022
relisted February 3, 2023

  • $729,900
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,834 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $398
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed April 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $429,000, December 2021
  • Neighborhood: Westerwood
  • Note: The property includes a detached two-car garage with a second floor.
    • Wildly expensive for the neighborhood: 10 comparable houses sold in Westerwood in 2022; the highest price was $245 per square foot.
    • The address first appears in the city directory in 1924, when the house was listed as vacant. It was sold three times that year. Alexander C. “Sandy” Forsyth (1869-1940) bought the house in November 1924. He and his wife, Henrietta Clapp Forsyth (1871-1945), owned it until 1944. Sandy, a native of Canada, was a traveling salesman.

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County

13 Houses in Greensboro’s College Hill Historic District and Nearby Neighborhoods, Listed All at Once

  • Greensboro landlord James Dutton owned 13 rental houses when he died last month. All have been put up for sale at once with a total asking price of almost $5 million. Nine are in the College Hill Historic District. All were built between about 1896 and 1926, and all were originally single-family houses, split into apartments decades ago. Except for two houses on North Cedar Street, they’re close to UNCG. Click the link above for details.

705 N. Greene Street, Greensboro
Structure only — The house must be moved
The Emma and Florence Monroe House
sale pending, new location secured

  • Price to be determined
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,026 square feet
  • Built in 1912 (per county)
  • Listed August 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $42,750, February 1976
  • Note: The Preservation Greensboro Development Fund is seeking a buyer to save this house from demolition. It will have to be moved from its present site.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival Foursquare. Simply finished, hip-roofed house with front hipped dormers, plain cornerboards and friezeboards, and round-columned front porch.”
    • Ownership of the land can be traced back to Captain Basil Fisher, the original developer of Fisher Park. After his death the land passed through several hands until it was sold to sisters Emma and Florence Monroe in 1912.
    • The house was built between 1914-1915. Emma Jane Monroe (1860-1950) lived to age 90 and had no formal occupation listed in city directories. Florence Estelle Monroe (1874-1968) lived to the age of 94. She was a stenographer and notary for area law firms, and she was active in the N.C. Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. She served as local president in 1923. The house remained in their names until 1969.

304 Woodlawn Avenue, Greensboro
The Alex and Henrietta Forsythe House
listing withdrawn May 16, 2022
relisted February 3, 2023

  • $729,900
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,834 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $398
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed April 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $429,000, December 2021
  • Neighborhood: Westerwood
  • Note: The property includes a detached two-car garage with a second floor.
    • Wildly expensive for the neighborhood: 10 comparable houses sold in Westerwood in 2022; the highest price was $245 per square foot.
    • The address first appears in the city directory in 1924, when the house was listed as vacant. It was sold three times that year. Alexander C. “Sandy” Forsyth (1869-1940) bought the house in November 1924. He and his wife, Henrietta Clapp Forsyth (1871-1945), owned it until 1944. Sandy, a native of Canada, was a traveling salesman.

513 N. Mendenhall Street, Greensboro
The Eli and Minnie Craven House
listing withdrawn January 22, 2023

  • $422,500
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,085 square feet, 0.19 acre
  • Price/square foot: $212
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed November 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $262,000, June 2006
  • Neighborhood: Westerwood
  • Note: The original owners of this foursquare were Eli Franklin Craven, “the Road Machinery Man,” and Minnie Miranda Phipps Craven. The long-lived Eli (1875-1964) and Minnie (1882-1973) bought the house in 1922 and lived in it for the rest of their lives, 42 years for Eli and 51 for Minnie.
  • Eli’s ad in the 1923 city directory:
  • $419,000 (originally $449,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,787 square feet, 0.28 acre
  • Price/square foot: $150
  • Built in 1915
  • Listed November 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $300,000, July 2022
  • Neighborhood: College Hill Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Bought in July by one of those “We Buy Houses” outfits (“Are You Looking For A Fast As-Is Cash Sale Without The Hassles?”) for well below the prevailing price in the neighborhood. After some degree of work, the house is listed at 50 percent more than the July price but is still described in the listing as a “fix and flip or rental” property.
    • Renovated in 1994 by Win and Ann Milam, who restored several properties in the historic district as well as the nearby Double Oaks mansion, listed on the National Register.
    • The house first appeared in the city directory in 1917 with Timothy C. Ward and Dora Ward as residents. They bought the property that year and apparently built the house. Timothy was the state manager of the Toledo Safe Company.
    • In 1922 the Wards sold the house to William Brown Little (1874-1943) and Grace Darling Dry Little (1892-1992). William was a district manger for Southern Bell.
    • The house remained in the Little family for 71 years, being sold after Grace’s death at age 100 by their only child, Laura Grace Little Truitt (1924-2018).

2501 Huffine Mill Road, McLeansville, Guilford County
sale pending January 12, 2023

  • $399,900
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3,650 square feet, 3.61 acres
  • Price/square foot: $110
  • Built in 1865
  • Listed January 1, 2023
  • Last sale: December 1970, price not recorded on deed

1008 Haywood Street, Greensboro
listing withdrawn March 4, 2018; relisted December 30, 2018
listing withdrawn November 5, 2019; relisted March 13, 2020 (at $189,000)
listing withdrawn July 24, 2021; relisted October 19, 2021
listing withdrawn January 17, 2022; relisted October 17, 2022
listing withdrawn January 15, 2023

  • $329,900 (originally $499,000, later as low as $219,999)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,604 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $206
  • Built in 1905
  • Listed November 25, 2017
  • Last sale: $65,000, November 1998
  • Neighborhood: Glenwood
  • Note: For sale by owner
    • Zillow listing says the house is 1,804 square feet; county tax records say 1,604.
    • Even reduced significantly from the original price, it’s still priced far higher that what you would expect to pay for a house in Glenwood.

926 Walker Avenue, Greensboro

  • $319,900 (originally $329,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,832 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $175
  • Built in 1910 (per county, but probably earlier; see note below)
  • Listed September 28, 2022
  • Last sale: $120,000, May 1997
  • Neighborhood: College Hill Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Q Anne/Colonial Rev, Residence, 1900-05, 2 [floors].”
    • The property was owned by James M. May from 1903 to 1918. He bought it as the result of a legal dispute among the heirs of previous owner N.A. Jeffries. It was probably a rental; May was never listed as living there.
    • The address first appears in the 1903-04 city directory with W.S. Powell listed as the resident (oddly, he wasn’t listed in the alphabetical directory). The 1905-06 directory lists William L. Manning, superintendent of the Greensboro Table Company, as the resident, along with Miss Annie Manning, a telephone operator.
    • From about 1909 to 1916, the house was occupied by Thomas O. Ralls, his wife, Flora Etta York Ralls and their family. Ralls was a woodworker and a merchant. Three of their sons operated grocery stores.
    • By 1917, the residents were listed as Robert L. Sapp Sr. (1868-1938), his wife, Louise (or Lula) M. Clendenin Sapp (1868-1937), and their son Robert Jr. (1898-1985). Father and son were electricians.
    • Lula apparently was related to James May. In 1918 she bought the house from him for $5. It remained in the Sapp family for 27 years, but her ownership had to withstand a legal challenge, presumably from other relatives.
    • Lula’s deed stipulated that “she will provide for, take care of, maintain and support (clothing, hospital and doctor’s bills excepted) the party of the first part [May], and furnish for him a reasonably comfortable room for and during the balance or remainder of his natural life, or so such or such part thereof as the party of the first part shall remain in the house or home of the party of the second part, as a member of her family …”
    • The sale was disputed by Simpson A. May and others, presumably more relatives of James May. Lula ended up having to buy the house again in 1921, this time for $3,955.
    • After his parents’ deaths, Robert Jr. owned the house until 1945.
    • In 1945, Minnie Ardena Bennett Heath (1881-1969) and daughter-in-law Lucy Talley Heath (1909 or 1910 to 1996) bought the house and lived there. Although they were both married — Adrena and her husband, John Lee Heath (1879-1953), were the parents of Lucy’s husband, Howard Arnold Heath (1905-1963) — the deed was in the names of the two women. After Adrena died in 1969, Lucy’s ownership continued until her death in 1996, 51 years after they bought the house.

623 Summit Avenue, Greensboro
The Jesse and Kate Keith House
sale pending November 10 to December 24, 2022
sale pending January 2, 2023

  • $275,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,155 square feet, 0.26 acre
  • Price/square foot: $128
  • Built in 1913
  • Listed November 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $50,000, March 2017
  • Neighborhood: Dunleath Historic District (local), Summit Avenue Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: The house has been a B&B and an Airbnb since its 2017 renovation.
    • The house first appeared in the city directory in the 1912-13 edition with Jesse E. Keith and Kate A. Keith, the original owners, as residents. Jesse was co-proprietor of Keith & Patterson, a tailor shop at 203 S. Elm Street. They sold the house in 1920.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Eclectic foursquare: A central band of shingles, broken by an elevated side bay, adds an unusual Prairie style accent to this weatherboarded, late-teens, Craftsman and Colonial Revival style foursquare; brick piers support its classical porch columns, and its hip roof has wide overhanging eaves.”

302 Oakwood Avenue, High Point
sale pending January 24, 2023

  • $198,000 (originally $220,000, later $250,000)
  • Duplex, total of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,860 square feet, 0.26 acre
  • Price/square foot: $69
  • Built in 1914
  • Listed July 19, 2022
  • Last sale: $105,000, September 2020
  • Neighborhood: Oakwood Historic District (NRHP)
  • Listing: “Home has been mostly remodeled …. Just a few finishing touches needed to make it move-in ready! No permits were pulled for renovation.”
  • District NRHP nomination: “frame Queen Anne with wooden shingle accents in gables and as bands on three-sided bay at north side of house; projecting three-sided end bay on main facade capped by attic pediment; wide front porch extends to porte cochere. Approximately 3,000 square feet.
    • “Frazier managed Frazier Piano Company in High Point.”

702 Park Street, High Point
sale pending December 20, 2022

  • $129,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 1 bathrooms, 2,247 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $57
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed December 14, 2022
  • Last sale: $95,000, October 2019
  • Note: Rental property with cheap “improvements” (vinyl siding, replacement windows and “luxury” plastic flooring)
    • The house needs some serious cosmetic work on the interior.

Winston-Salem and Forsyth County

726 N. Stratford Road, Winston-Salem
The Jerry and Elizabeth Hester House
sale pending February 5, 2023

  • $970,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,632 square feet, 0.37 acre
  • Price/square foot: $267
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed February 3, 2023
  • Last sale: $860,000, August 2021
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
  • Note: The original owners appear to have been Jerry Lee Hester (1876-1949) and Elizabeth Pearl Stipe Hester (1886-1969). They were listed at the address in 1928, the first year the city directory listed Stratford Road, and lived there until at least 1949, when Jerry died. He was a shoe salesman.

704 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston-Salem
sale pending January 17, 2023

  • $399,900
  • 4 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 2,227 square feet, 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $180
  • Built in 1922
  • Listed January 7, 2023
  • Last sale: $212,500, June 2018
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival. Two story; hip roof; brick; twelve-over-one windows; hip-roof entry porch with roof balustrade; paired, Tuscan columns; side porch with roof balustrade; modillions; solider course watertable.”

300 West End Boulevard, Winston-Salem
The Oscar and Francis Efird House

  • $399,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 2,088 square feet, 0.25 acre
  • Price/square foot: $191
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed February 3, 2023
  • Last sale: $89,500, May 1984
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NR)
  • Note: The property includes the home’s original two-car brick garage.
  • District NR nomination: “The Efird House is a simple but stately two-story frame Colonial Revival house with a gable roof, weatherboard siding, paired sash windows, and a north side porch with slender Tuscan columns.
    • “The paneled entrance with sidelights and broad fanlight transom is sheltered by a pedimented Classical porch with Tuscan columns and a vaulted ceiling. The house has a stone retaining wall and steep stone steps to the terraced yard.
    • “Oscar O. Efird, an attorney and judge, and his wife, Frances, purchased the property in 1922 and were first listed in the city directory at this location in 1925. The Efirds owned the house until 1974.”
    • The Honorable Judge Oscar Ogburn Efird (1982-1974) was born in Winston and graduated from Roanoke College, class of 1912; Princeton, where he received a master’s degree; and Harvard, where he earned his law degree in 1919.
    • “At age 35, he was named judge of Forsyth County court and received seven two-years commissions from subsequent governors of North Carolina,” the Roanoke College website says. “He was the youngest judge of comparable jurisdiction in the state.”
    • The judge served as president of the Isaak Walton League and the North Carolina Skeet Shooting Association and was active in the Sons of the American Revolution and Rotary. He received the Roanoke College Medal in 1970 “for his life of productiveness and significance, as well as his distinctive service and professional achievements.”
    • Frances Kathrina Susan Koiner Efird (1892-1967) was born in Roanoke. She and Oscar were married in 1920.

1124 West End Boulevard, Winston-Salem
The Miller-Hancock House
listing expired December 19, 2018; relisted May 20, 2022
listing withdrawn June 23, 2022
relisted July 12, 2022

  • $329,900 (originally listed at $249,000, later $379,999)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,545 square feet (per county), 0.22 acre
  • Price/square foot: $130
  • Built in 1911
  • Last sale: $151,500, July 2007
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District
  • Note: The owner has been trying to sell it, off and on, since 2010 at prices ranging from $149,000 to, now, $400,000.
    • Rental property
    • District NRHP nomination: “This Colonial Revival cottage is a one-and-a-half-story weatherboarded frame house with a clipped gable roof.
      • “It features a hipped front dormer, a glass and wood paneled entrance with sidelights, a facade porch with Tuscan columns and a plain balustrade, steep wooden steps to the porch, and a high brick porch foundation with large south-facing windows.
      • “Like many of the houses on the street, it has a stone retaining wall bordering the front yard and stone front steps.
      • “Mary Eva Miller purchased the property in 1910, and the 1917 Sanborn map shows that the house had been built by that time. The 1918 city directory — the first to cover this area of West End Blvd. — lists Paul L. Miller, a contractor, and his wife, Eva, as residing at this location.
      • “They occupied the house through 1935 and sold it to Thomas W. and Alice B. Hancock in 1941.” The Hancocks occupied the house at least until 1975. By 1986 the house was a rental. The family retained ownership of the property until July 2007.

717 E. Devonshire Street, Winston-Salem
sale pending January 31, 2023

  • $189,900
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,705 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $70
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed November 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $78,000, November 2004
  • Neighborhood: Waughtown-Belview Historic ?District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “I- house. Two-story; side gable; asbestos shingle siding; one-over-one windows; gable returns; diamond attic vent; hip-roof porch; turned posts. Appears on 1917 Sanborn map.”

2423 Lomond Street, Winston-Salem
sale pending September 14-16, 2022
sale pending October 3-20, 2022
sale pending January 10, 2023

  • $149,900 (originally $199,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,767 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $84
  • Built in 1920 (per county, but probably later; see note)
  • Listed July 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $42,500, August 1999
  • Neighborhood: Sunnyside/Central Terrace Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “One-and-a-half-story side-gable Craftsman Bungalow with shed-roof dormer; four (vertical)-over-one, double-hung sash; gable-roof porch with square posts.”
    • The address wasn’t listed in the city directory until 1929. Robert Lee Culp (1880-1944) and Eula Pearl Tate Culp (1878-1963) were listed as residents. Robert was a carpenter.

2401 Urban Street, Winston-Salem
sale pending October 21, 2022
no longer under contract November 18, 2022

  • $99,900 (originally $144,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,104 square feet, 0.10 acre
  • Price/square foot: $47
  • Built in 1900 (possibly later; see note)
  • Listed July 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $76,000, July 2018
  • Neighborhood: Belview, Waughtown-Belview Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Urban Street doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1915.
    • The property has been sold seven times in this century.
    • This property’s original address was 201 Urban Street.
    • The store was operated by I.L. Campbell in 1915; J.B. Whitley, 1916-22; Daisy M. Williamson, 1923-37; William B. Wicker, 1938; James T. Lawrence, 1939-1959; and others later. It was a grocery store through at least 1963.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Another prominent building in the Belview area of the district is a rare example of a two-story store/house combination located at 2401 Urban Street. … Although altered with vinyl siding, the building is a rare example of a frame commercial building in the district.”
    • “Two-story; hip roof; vinyl siding; recessed entry; upper level porch; one-over-one windows. Appears on 1917 Sanborn map.”

Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties

491 Southpoint Trail, Semora, Person County

  • $1.2 million
  • 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,944 square feet, 1.26 acres
  • Price/square foot: $304
  • The depot was built in 1880; it was moved to the current location in 1980.
  • Listed January 13, 2023
  • Last sale: $579,000, July 2020
  • HOA: $469/year
  • Note: The depot was moved 23 miles from Mayo, Virginia.
    • The property includes 480 feet of shoreline on Hyco Lake, a dock with dock house and boat slip, a two-car garage and raised garden beds. It’s just across the county line from Caswell County.
    • The few pictures of the interior suggest little of the original depot remains inside the house.

8587 Lindley Mill Road, Snow Camp, Alamance County

  • $675,000 (originally $975,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,852 square feet, 42 acres
  • Price/square foot: $364
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: 1909 or earlier, price unknown
  • Note: The house may have been built by farmer Amos Julius Richardson (1854-1938). In 1909 ownership passed to two of his children, eight-year-old Arthur Wilbert Richardson (1901-1983) and Daisy Richardson (1884-1971). Arthur’s son Ralph Gray Richardson (1933-2021) inherited the farm in 1983. It being sold by his heirs.
    • Ralph was a graduate of Eli Whitney High School and Burlington Business College. He was a beef and chicken farmer and also worked at Western Electric and the UNC-Chapel Hill public safety department. He was an Army veteran of the Korean War.

408 S. 3rd Street, Mebane, Alamance County
sale pending January 31, 2023
no longer under contract February 6, 2023

  • $395,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,347 square feet, 0.34 acre
  • Price/square foot: $168
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed January 27, 2023
  • Last sale: $225,000, June 2018
  • Neighborhood: Old South Mebane Historic District (NR)
  • Note: The property includes a garden pond, a workshop and a carport.
  • District NR nomination: “This is a 2-story Queen Anne-style vinyl-clad house of wood construction with a hipped roof with an interior chimney and projecting side, rear, and front gabled roofs of standing-seam metal and circular vents in the gable ends with incised floral motifs.
    • “The house exhibits a centered entry and a shed-roofed front porch supported by battered wood posts resting on brick piers. Flat-windows, with both large multi-light fixed original sash on the first floor of the façade and replacement windows. A 1-story rear gabled ell is present.”

716 S. Main Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
The Wray-Rainey-Webster House
Blog post — New Listing: The 1850 Wray-Rainey-Webster House in Reidsville, $350,000

  • $350,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,494 square feet, 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $100
  • Built in 1850 (per county)
  • Listed January 20, 2023
  • Last sale: July 1986, price unknown
  • Neighborhood: Reidsville Historic District (NRHP), Old Post Road Historic District (local)
  • Note: The listing gives the date of the house as 1860. the district’s National Register nomination puts it at circa 1860.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Believed to be one of the oldest houses surviving in the district, this two-story frame residence has changed hands more than most of the pivotal houses, and its original location was some one hundred yards to the south on the present site of the Hugh Reid Scott [House].
    • “The first occupant is said to have been Richard H. Wray, a later postmaster of Reidsville, although supporting documentation has not been found. The first recorded owner was John Rainey, a farmer, who was followed by Colonel John R. Webster (1845-1909), publisher of Webster’s Dollar Weekly, and later by Hugh Reid Scott, as well as several others.
    • “These changing ownerships have resulted in alterations to the house, although the exterior of the front section remains relatively intact in its late 19th century appearance. This two-story single-pile section is topped by a low hipped roof of standing seam tin with deep bracketed eaves and a paneled frieze, relating it to more elaborate Italianate houses in the district.
    • “The three-bay facade is spanned by a one-story Eastlake-style porch with central two-tier pedimented pavillion. Ornamentation includes a spindled frieze, turned and bracketed posts, spindle balusters, and sawn gable ornament on the porch and paneled cornerboards.
    • “Windows are six over six sash in simple surrounds, and the brick chimneys rise in an interior end location.
    • “A one-story, two-room ell was added across the rear early in the 20th century; a more recent one-story addition rests on brick piers.”
    • The Colonel started Webster’s Dollar Weekly in 1875. At some point in the 1880s, it was renamed Webster’s Weekly. It was published until 1916.

717 W. Davis Street, Burlington, Alamance County
sale pending September 15 to November 11, 2022
sale pending December 31, 2022
Update: The various online listing services now agree that it under contract.

  • $315,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,156 square feet, 0.39 acre
  • Price/square foot: $100
  • Built in 1931
  • Listed September 3, 2022
  • Last sale: May 2022, price not recorded on deed (it was most likely donated; see note below)
  • Neighborhood: West Davis Street-Fountain Place Historic District
  • Listing: “Property needs TLC”
    • The current owner is the Church of the Redeemer, an Anglican parish in Greensboro.
    • Previously, the property had been owned by the family of Roger Gant Sr. (1887-1960) for 102 years. Gant was a son of John Q. Gant, founder of still-thriving Glen Raven Mills (established 1880 as Altamahaw Cotton Mills). Roger became president of Glen Raven when his father died in 1930, serving until he died in 1960.
    • Roger bought the property in 1920. He lived at 1016 W. Davis Street; 717 was occupied by one of his brothers, Russell Gant (1893-1978). The Russell Gant Company was a wholesaler of yarn.
  • District NRHP nomination: “This two-story mid-1930s brick-veneered house has a gambrel roof, three-bay facade, engaged porch with square posts, wide shed dormer, and two-story frame rear addition. The distinguishing feature of this Period House is the very shallow arch between each of the porch posts.” No owners or residents of the property are listed.

433 N. Logan Street, Burlington, Alamance County

  • $280,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 1,745 square feet, 0.50 acre
  • Price/square foot: $160
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed November 19, 2022
  • Last sale: $110,000, May 2022
  • Note: The aggressive color scheme, including the painted masonry (always a bad idea), is all new.
    • Something you don’t see every day: There’s a wall-mounted drinking fountain in what looks to be a small mud room.
    • How the house looked before its 2022 renovation:

433 Boone Road, Eden, Rockingham County
The Ray-McCallum House
sale pending January 19, 2023

  • $259,000 (originally $280,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,938 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $91
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed November 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $60,100, August 2018
  • Neighborhood: Highlands, Boone Road Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Several good examples of the ornate, full-blown Queen Anne style appear in the district. These include the Ray-McCallum House at 433 Boone Road, which features a variety of decorative exterior woodwork including sawn brackets with bullseyes, drop pendants, curved raking boards with bosses, tall paneled and dentilled lintels above the main elevation’s windows, turned posts and balusters and sawn foliate spandrels at the front porch.”
    • “Like the Morehead-Sweaney-Stone House next door, this house was constructed by Spray Water Power and Land Company around the turn of the century for the use of its mill officials; its decorative elements, however, more emphatically evoke the nineteenth century in their expression of the Queen Anne style.
    • “Sawn brackets with bull’s eye and drop pendants appear at the base of the gable surmounting the front polygonal bay, and the gable features curved raking boards with bosses and a pointed arched surround at the small attic window. The front porch is typical of the period with its turned posts and balusters and sawn foliate spandrels.
    • “Another distinctive feature of the property are the tall panelled and dentilled lintels above the six windows of the front wing.
    • “The earliest known occupants of the house were R.P. Ray and his family, who lived here during the first decade of this century; Ray operated the Spray Mercantile.
    • “Later, Dr. A. Herman Stone lived here a short while with his mother and sister before moving to the Morehead-Sweaney-Stone House.
    • “The Stones were succeeded by Mr. and Mrs. Numa H. McCollum, who remained here until their natural deaths, both on the same day, in the early 1960s.”

101 W. Academy Street, Madison, Rockingham County
The Pratt-Van Noppen House
sale pending October 17-November 8, 2022
sale pending January 11, 2023

  • $189,900 (originally $199,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,350 square feet, 0.36 acre
  • Price/square foot: $81
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $200,000, September 2016
  • Neighborhood: Academy Street Historic District
  • Listing: “Zoned for business and/or residential use.” County tax records describe it as an office building.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story frame T-shaped house with two tall interior brick chimneys.
    • “Distinguishing features are a two-story, three-sided bay in projecting gabled wing of facade, richly carved pendant brackets all along the roofline, and classical details, including Tuscan porch columns and molded architraves topped by boxed heads above doors and windows.
    • “Thomas Ruffin Pratt (1856-1937), prominent local civic and business leader, had the house built during the 1890s. The current [as of 1980] owner is Pratt’s grandson.”
    • Thomas and Maybud Julia Pratt (1861-1932) had at least four children. Ownership of the house apparently passed to the eldest, Annie Pearl Pratt Van Noppen (1886-1968). Her husband, John James Van Noppen II (1871-1919), was a first-generation Dutch American and a dentist in Spray. He died in the Spanish Flu pandemic.
    • Annie was a teacher and contributed articles to Madison’s newspaper, The Messenger, including a series on historic homes along the Dan River in Rockingham County. After John’s death at age 47, she never remarried and outlived him by 49 years.
    • From Thomas’s findagrave.com listing: “Thomas and his brother, Charles Benton Pratt, operated a general merchandise store located in the south half of the Carter-Moir Hardware Store.
    • “The two-story building that housed their general merchandise store is located in the Leaksville Commercial Historic District and is included in the National Register of Historic Places. It is a two-story brick building built in the 1880’s and noted for its decorative brickwork. The building may also have housed the Bank of Leaksville, chartered in 1889.
    • “In the 1890’s Thomas built a two-story T-shaped house at 101 W. Academy Street noted for richly carved brackets and classical details. Thomas also sold insurance. His other business pursuits included a brick manufacturing plant and a mortuary.
    • “He served as a Rockingham County Commissioner and was involved in the infamous story of Rockingham County’s ‘Bridge to Nowhere‘, a bridge built in 1929 across the Dan River with no approaches or connecting roads. Thomas was the chairman of the Rockingham County [Board of Commissioners] when the contract was approved for building the bridge. That resulted in a lengthy and famous lawsuit between the county and the builders, Luten Bridge Company.”
    • In an entertaining academic legal paper, the Luten Bridge/Mebane Bridge case is recounted as “a remarkable story, one that arose within a heated tax revolt pitting the county’s farmers against its most celebrated industrialist. Much more than a crisp illustration of the duty to mitigate, Rockingham County v. The Luten Bridge Co. offers a window into a southern community’s struggles with a divided social order, the introduction of wealth into local politics, and a changing economy.”

527 Barnes Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
sale pending June 5 to July 2, 2022
listing withdrawn July 2, 2022; relisted August 3, 2022
sale pending October 17-31, 2022
sale pending November 10, 2022
no longer under contract November 18, 2022

  • $169,500 (originally $194,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 2,032 square feet, 0.45 acre
  • Price/square foot: $83
  • Built in 1909
  • Listed May 30, 2022
  • Last sale: $30,000, November 1995
  • Note: Cheaply renovated with vinyl siding and vinyl replacement windows

400 W. Main Street, Mayodan, Rockingham County

  • $149,900
  • 1 bedroom, 1 1/2 bathroom, 2,000 square feet, 0.1 acre
  • Price/square foot: $75
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed December 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $55,000, September 2013
  • Neighborhood: Downtown
  • Note: Former commercial building, has a kitchen and separate breakfast area.
    • The property includes a deck and a two-car driveway.
    • Little information on the property’s history appears to exist online. Between 1959 and 1963 (and perhaps before and after those years), it was the photography studio of Joseph Michael Dalton (1915-1972). Joseph and his wife, Minnie Boaz Leath Dalton (1914-1975), were listed as living in the building as well. It was the only photography studio in Mayodan (although there was another in Madison).

101 N. Franklin Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County

  • $139,900 (originally $164,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,288 square feet, 0.44 acre
  • Price/square foot: $61
  • Built in 1908
  • Listed December 5, 2022
  • Last sale: $129,000, September 2022
  • Listing: “Needs minor renovation.”

801 N. Mebane Street, Burlington, Alamance County

  • Not given in MLS listing (see note below)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,280 square feet, 0.51 acre
  • Price/square foot: To be determined
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed September 27, 2022
  • Last sale: $60,000, September 2016
  • Something you don’t see every day: One of 54 properties for sale all together for $7.8 million or individually. For the list of properties and their individual prices, contact the agent.
  • Listing: “Single Family, Duplex, Triplex and QuadPlex. Burlington, Graham, Reidsville, Eden and surrounding areas!”

Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties

3007 Riverside Drive, Mount Airy, Surry County
The Sparger House

  • $469,000 (originally $479,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2,486 square feet, 6.1 acres
  • Price/square foot: $189
  • Built in 1864
  • Listed September 27, 2022
  • Last sale: $61,000, July 1981
  • Note: The property includes a pond and creek, a three-stall horse barn with tack room and spring house, and a detached garage with a full bath and an office.
    • Located north of Mount Airy on N.C. Highway 104 near the Salem community and the White Sulphur Springs community, a 19th century resort.
    • The State Historic Preservation Office’s map of historic sites shows this property as “Sparger House,” but offers no other details. An 1862 deed shows a property being bought by William Simpson Sparger (1833-1915). The description of the property is vague, but it appears at least to be in the same general area. The deed indicates it was adjacent to another property owned by either William or another member of the Sparger family.
    • William was a grandson of Johan Wolfensbarger (17454-1840), the first member of the family to move to Surry County (Johan later changed his name to John W. Sparger).
    • William was a farmer, according to census records, and apparently had many friends. A report on his death in The Charlotte Observer said, “An immense crowd of relatives and friends accompanied the remains to the place of interment. Mr. Sparger was the last of the old Sparger generation in the state, and his friends were numbered by the score. He was 82 years of age and highly esteemed by everybody.”
    • The house is near the site of the Smith & Sparger Tobacco Factory. Background on the locally prominent family is here and here.

304 W. Main Street, East Bend, Yadkin County
sale pending December 11, 2022
no longer under contact January 5, 2023

  • $169,900 (originally $199,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,982 square feet, 0.90 acre
  • Price/square foot: $86
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed September 26, 2022
  • Last sale: $62,500, August 2022

Davidson, Randolph, Montgomery and Chatham Counties

210 W. 3rd Avenue, Lexington, Davidson County
The Hubert Olive House

  • $380,000 (originally $399,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,122 square feet, 0.96 acre
  • Price/square foot: $122
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed January 20, 2023
  • Last sale: $310,000, September 2021
  • Listing: “elegant Georgian style home built by Honorable Superior Court Judge and Legislator Hubert E. Olive.” City directories show him at the address as late at 1964.
    • Hubert Ethridge Olive Sr. (1895-1972) was the son of a farmer, born in Randleman. He served in Army during World War I, seeing combat in France as a first lieutenant in a field artillery unit. After the ear, he graduated from Mars Hill College, where he played football for four years, and Wake Forest, where he received his law degree.
    • He practiced in Lexington, where held his first judgeship in the town’s lower court. Olive was elected to the state House in 1933 and became an ally of Clyde Hoey, who was elected governor in 1936. Hoey named Olive to the Superior Court bench in 1937. He served for 18 years. He also chaired the state Board of Elections for two years.
    • “A spectacular personality in the courtroom, Olive had a powerful, resonant voice, a great abundance of thick white hair, and a massive six-foot frame (he wore a size fourteen shoe),” his biography on NCpedia says. “Under his judgeship, court was held in a dignified, authoritative manner without any impudence or horseplay.”
    • He ran for governor in 1952, declaring his platform “progressive” (whatever that meant in North Carolina in 1952), but lost in the Democratic primary to William B. Umstead. Olive was a longtime member of the Wake Forest College board of trustees. In 1956 he chaired the fund-raising campaign to raise $7.5 million to match the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation’s gift to move the college to Winston-Salem. He taught Sunday school at Lexington’s First Baptist Church for 40 years and “was considered one of the most competent, willing, and scholarly laymen of his day.”

208 E. Raleigh Avenue, Liberty, Randolph County
listing withdrawn, fall 2022 (exact date not recorded); relisted January 12, 2023
sale pending January 16, 2023

  • $319,000 (originally $325,000, later $310,00)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,388 square feet (per county), 0.64 acre
  • Price/square foot: $134
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed July 26, 2022
  • Last sale: $82,500, July 1998
  • Note: The listing shows 2,601 square feet.
    • Listing: “Loaded with so much character.” That’s true, but it also has cheap replacement windows and vinyl siding.
    • A previous listing showed 3 bedrooms. This one says, “It’s a 5-bedroom home, currently set up and utilized as a 3-bedroom home, with bdrm 4 & 5 being used as other style of rooms that fit current seller needs.”
    • The property includes an 18 foot-by-18 foot outdoor kitchen in the backyard.

135 W. Dolphin Street, Siler City, Chatham County
sale pending January 4, 2023
no longer under contract January 31, 2023

  • $200,000 (originally $239,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,107 square feet, 0.63 acre
  • Price/square foot: $95
  • Built in 1899
  • Listed December 15, 2022
  • Last sale: $110,000, September 2022
  • Note: Cheap plastic floors, replacement windows and siding. It even has popcorn ceilings.