Historic Houses

Updated August 15, 2022

The most historic, notable and distinctive classic houses now for sale in the Triad

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Featured Listing
Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties
Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties
Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

Recent Sales

174 W. Poplar Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
sale pending August 13, 2022

  • $295,000 (originally $320,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $107
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 31, 2022
  • Last sales: $245,000 on September 16, 2021; $196,000, September 2020
  • Neighborhood: Lebanon Hills Historic District
  • Note: The house was previously listed with three bedrooms.
  • District National Register nomination: “A swooping asymmetrical front-gable roof is the defining feature of this two-story Tudor Revival house, which is frame with a textured stucco finish. The swooping part of the roof engages a corner entry porch with segmental-arched openings.
    • “Above is a picturesque segmental-arched casement window; other windows are six-over-one wood sash with a few one-over-one replacement sashes.
    • “At the top of the front and side gables is false half-timbering with cruck (curved) members. Other features include an exterior chimney with sloped shoulders on the east side, asphalt-shingle roofing, a wood panel front door, a modern shed-roofed back porch, and a wall along the east lot line with a granite pillar at the sidewalk.”

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County

705 N. Greene Street, Greensboro
Structure only — The house must be moved
The Emma and Florence Monroe House

  • Price to be determined
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,026 square feet
  • Built in 1912 (per county)
  • Listed August 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $42,750, February 1976
  • Note: The Preservation Greensboro Development Fund is seeking a buyer to save this house from demolition. It will have to be moved from its present site.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival Foursquare. Simply finished, hip-roofed house with front hipped dormers, plain cornerboards and friezeboards, and round-columned front porch.”
    • Ownership of the land can be traced back to Captain Basil Fisher, the original developer of Fisher Park. After his death the land passed through several hands until it was sold to sisters Emma and Florence Monroe in 1912.
    • The house was built between 1914-1915. Emma Jane Monroe (1860-1950) lived to age 90 and had no formal occupation listed in city directories. Florence Estelle Monroe (1874-1968) lived to the age of 94. She was a stenographer and notary for area law firms, and she was active in the N.C. Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs. She served as local president in 1923. The house remained in their names until 1969.
  • $895,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,464 square feet, 7.71 acres
  • Price/square foot: $363
  • Built in 1910 (per county)
  • Listed May 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $230,000, August 1998
  • Note: The property includes an in-ground saltwater pool, log cabin, 5-plus acres of horse pastures, a barn with a two-car and a shed.
    • The listing gives a 1908 date for the house.

604 Scott Avenue, Greensboro
The Chapman and Frances Harbour House
listing withdrawn June 22, 2022
relisted August 13, 2022

  • $799,000 (originally $899,900)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,954 square feet, 0.83 acre
  • Price/square foot: $270
  • Built in 1917
  • Listed June 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $145,000, February 2021 (apparently wasn’t listed in MLS)
  • Neighborhood: Lindley Park
  • Note: Even reduced by $100,000, the price is spectacularly high for Lindley Park, which has been one of the more affordable older neighborhoods in Greensboro.
    • The original owners were Chapman Lee Harbour (1874-1951) and Frances Terry Harbour (1882-1958). Chapman was an inspector for South Atlantic Lumber Company. Later, he was a nurseryman in Colfax and lived in Asheboro.
    • Both came from large families in Patrick County, Virginia. Chapman was the first of 10 children, all but one of whom lived to adulthood (siblings: John, Starling, Victoria, Mary, Dovie, Exony, Zachary, William and Martha).
    • Frances was the 12th of 13 children. At least two died in childhood; two others lived to be 99 (she had eight siblings and four half-siblings: Julia, John, Samuel, Mary, Sarah, Ulysses Grant, Henry, James Madison, Joseph, Murray, William, and Carrie).
    • The Harbours sold the house in 1931 to George W. Brown (1866-1953) and Amelia Vandergriff Brown (1878-1949). They owned it until their deaths. Originally from Tennessee, they had been married since 1895. George was a superintendent and later a paving contractor, an occupation he took up at age 70 (according to the city directory).
    • In 1962 the house was sold to John Frank Yeattes Sr. (1890-1968) and Carrie R. Jobe Yeattes (1895-1994). Their family used the house as a rental and owned it for 59 years, until it was sold in 2021 for renovation. John was assistant clerk of Superior Court. Their son, John Frank Yeattes Jr. (1922-2010), was later a District Court judge in Guilford County.
    • How the house looked when it was sold in 2021:

1907 Madison Avenue, Greensboro
The Esther and William Truitt House
listing withdrawn July 8, 2022 (same day it was listed)

  • $789,750
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,833 square feet, 0.25 acre
  • Price/square foot: $206
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed July 8, 2022
  • Last sale: $430,000, August 2017
  • Neighborhood: Sunset Hills Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “The one-and-a-half-story, three-bay, front-gabled, brick Colonial Revival-influenced house displays a flat-roofed portico graced with a dentil cornice.
    • “Tuscan columns and pilasters support the portico that is topped by a picket balustrade with crowning finials on its corner posts. A multi-light transom and multi-light sidelights frame the paneled wood door.
    • “Windows are replacement nine-over-nine and are topped by brick relieving semi-elliptical arches with cast masonry keystones and abutments.
    • “A large brick intersecting gable is located on the east elevation; a synthetic-sided, front-gabled dormer is just forward of it. The west elevation displays another front-gable sheathed in brick.
    • “At least two corbelled brick chimneys rise from the interior.”
    • William Brooks Truitt (1886-1962) earned a mechanical-engineering degree from N.C. State University. He was a co-founder of Carolina Steel in 1919 and served as vice president until leaving to found Truitt Manufacturing Co. in 1941. He was its president until 1957. In 1960, at the age of 74, he founded Truitt Metal Fabricators.
    • William taught the Truitt Bible Class at First Christian Church (now Congregational UCC) for more than 50 years. He was a trustee of Elon College and Elon Children’s Home. 
    • Esther Pearl Lowe Truitt (1892-1973) married William in 1912. William Brooks Truitt on September 10, 1912. She served as organist at First Christian Church for more than 50 years.
    • In 1935, the Truitts lost the house to foreclosure.

1820 Madison Avenue, Greensboro
The Barney-Farr-Hoover House

  • $699,900
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,604 square feet, 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $269
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed August 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $420,000, September 2018
  • Neighborhood: Sunset Hills Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “The two-story, three-bay, hip-roofed, brick Colonial Revival-inspired house includes a front-gabled hood supported by carved wood brackets and featuring a vaulted soffit. It shelters a fanlight that surmounts a paneled wood door with sidelights.
    • Windows are three-over-one and topped with soldier-course lintels. Half-circle, louvered wood vents sit on the east and west roof slopes.
    • “A brick chimney rises from the west elevation of the main block and through the low hip-roofed, one-story, brick wing that occupies that side of the house.
    • The rear (north) half of the wing contains a screened porch that tops a one-bay, basement garage.
    • “A one-story-on-basement, brick wing occupies the rear elevation.”
    • The original owners were Winfield Supply Barney Sr. (1883-1955) and Minnie Ola Drury Barney (1890-1974). Winfield was a professor of Romance languages at the North Carolina College for Women. He chaired the department from 1919 to 1953. Winfield was a founder of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, an elder of the Presbyterian Church of the Covenant and 1938 president of the Greensboro Civitan Club. The Barneys sold the house in 1929.
    • The house was owned for 30 years by the long-lived Sallie Hampton Copeland Farr (1876-1965) and William Beatty Farr (1876-1965). He was a traveling salesman. They bought the house in 1935 and lived in it until their deaths at age 88, Sallie just seven months after William.
    • In 1975, the house was bought by Jon Gary Hoover (1940-2003) and Roberta R. Hoover. Jon was a professor in the Department of Counseling and Educational Development at UNCG. Roberta sold the house in 2018.

202 Meadowbrook Terrace, Greensboro
The Pate-Carr House
sale pending August 1, 2022

  • $695,000
  • 3 bedrooms 4 bathrooms, 3,491 square feet, 0.22 acre
  • Price/square foot: $199
  • Built in 1922
  • Listed July 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $418,000, May 2015
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The original owners were Dr. Frederick James Pate (1885-1941) and Elizabeth Pate (dates unknown). Frederick was an ear-nose-and-throat doctor. He served as a captain in the medical corps in World War I. They lost the house to foreclosure in 1930.
    • From 1955 to 1997 the house was owned by Eberle William Carr (1907-1990) and Mildred Lee Refo Carr (1915-2004). William had served as a lieutenant commander in the Navy in Word War II. He was a vice president and trust officer with Security National Bank, which became North Carolina National Bank when it merged with Charlotte’s American Commercial Bank in 1960.

506 Woodland Drive, Greensboro
The Alex and Margaret Stockton House
sale pending June 22, 2022

  • $639,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,361 square feet, 0.29 acre
  • Price/square feet: $271
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed June 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, December 1989
  • Neighborhood: Latham Park
  • Listing: The property includes a guest house/office with a full bathroom and a fireplace that was originally used for cooking.
    • The original owners were Margaret and Alex Stockton, who bought the property from the J.A. Latham Co. in 1927. Alexander Lowrie Stockton (1876-1934) was managing editor of the Greensboro Daily News and vice president of the Greensboro News Co. and North State Engraving Co. Margaret R. Chambers Stockton (1881-1954) continued to live in the house after Alex’s death at age 58, selling it in 1940.

1106 Ferndale Boulevard, High Point
sale pending, August 3, 2022

  • $535,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,190 square feet, 0.81 acre
  • Price/square foot: $168
  • Built in 1932
  • Listed August 2, 2022
  • Last sale: $370,000, November 2018
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Note: The property includes a detached garage with a one-bedroom apartment.

1108 Ferndale Boulevard, High Point
sale pending August 3, 2022

  • $499,000 (originally $550,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,443 square feet, 0.69 acre
  • Price/square foot: $145
  • Built in 1936
  • Listed May 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $305,000, December 1999
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Note: Vinyl siding

1014 Country Club Drive, High Point
The James A. Myatt House
sale pending July 14, 2022
no longer under contract July 15, 2022

  • $495,000 (originally $515,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,969 square feet, 0.39 acre
  • Price/square foot: $167
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed June 2, 2022
  • Last sale: $110,000, August 1985
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood, Uptown Suburbs Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “This one-story, side-gabled, Tudor Revival-style house is three bays wide and double-pile with a steeply pitched, asphalt-shingled roof with flared eaves and a projecting, front-gabled wing on the right (south) end of the facade.
    • “The house has a stuccoed exterior with brick detailing and faux half-timbering in the gables. The leaded-glass, diamond-paned casement windows have rough-hewn lintels. There is brick detailing at the entrance and a batten door with leaded-glass light.
    • “A two-story, shed-roofed wing at the rear has batten sheating. There is a decorative brick chimney in the left (north) gable, a one-story, side-gabled, batten wing on the left elevation, and an attached, side-gabled, screened porch to its left.
    • “A low, brick retaining wall extends along the sidewalk.
    • “The earliest known occupant is James A. Myatt (attorney; city solicitor) in 1928.”

833 N. Elm Street, Greensboro
The Jennie Kerner House
sale pending August 5, 2022

  • $425,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,378 square feet, 0.15 acre
  • Price/square foot: $179
  • Built in 1925 (per county, probably earlier; see note)
  • Listed July 27, 2022
  • Last sale: $310,000, December 2013
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Zoned for offices, but it apparently has been used as a residential rental.
    • The property has an accessory dwelling unit now used for storage.
    • The original owner appears to have been Jennie D. Kerner (1863-1928), who appears at the address in the 1915 city directory. She was a widow (Robah Bascom Kerner, 1859-1893) and lived with her daughter, Robah Mae Kerner (1885-1976). The Kerns had three children. Robah Mae, born first, lived to be 90. The other two both died in infancy.
    • By 1917, Jennie and Robah Mae apparently had left Greensboro. Robah Mae had married in 1915 (J. Randolph Sowell, 1889-1966) and later lived in High Point. Jennie may have moved to Kernersville. Robah Bascom Kerner’s father, Dr. Elias Kerner, was a member of the town’s founding family and its first physician. Jennie is buried there with her husband and the Kerner family.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Stucccoed, hip-roofed, three-bay structure; fluted Corinthian columns at front portico and enclosed south sun porch; entry features ornate leaded glass sidelights; large trabeated windows to either side of entry.”

210 Edgedale Drive, High Point
The Tucker-Alexander House

  • $399,000 (originally $425,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,102 square feet, 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $190
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $292,500, November 2019
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Listing: “Stamped concrete driveway carries into back yard/patio. House is wired for electric car.”
  • District NRHP nomination: “This two-story, side-gabled Period Cottage is four bays wide and double-pile with a two-story, projecting gabled bay on the facade.
    • “The house has a brick veneer and six-over-six, wood-sash windows. There are two pairs of twelve-light, Craftsman-style French doors in the projecting bay with paired, nine-light, Craftsman-style windows in the gable above.
    • “The roof of the front-gabled bay extends to the right (east) to shelter an inset entrance with arched brick opening. The door is a solid, batten door.
    • “There is a low gable on the right end of the facade, an exterior brick chimney in the right gable, and a one-story, flat-roofed bay at the left (west) end of the facade with a terrace on its roof. A low, hip-roofed porch extends from the right rear (northeast).
    • The house first appears in the city directory in 1927 with the residents listed as Royster M. Tucker (1903-1948), an engineer with North State Telephone Company, and Nell Hayden Tucker (1905-1995) in 1927. He stayed with the local phone company and continued to live in the house until his death from a heart attack at age 45. Although Royster Sr. never rose to the executive level of the company, their son, Royster Jr., and grandson Royster III, both became CEOs of the company.
    • Nell sold the house in 1951, apparently over the strenuous objections of the couple’s two minor children, Royster Jr. and Velva, who went to court, with a guardian ad litem, in an attempt to block the sale.
    • In 1962 the house was sold to Thomas Bruce Alexander (dates unknown). It remained in the Alexander family for 57 years, until Thomas Bruce Alexander II sold it in 2019. The first T. Bruce Alexander was a product manager for Phillips-Foscue, a manufacturer of rubber and foam products for the furniture industry.

1300 W. Market Street, Greensboro
sale pending July 17, 2022
no longer under contract July 20, 2022

  • $399,900 (originally $459,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,872 square feet (per county), 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $139
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed May 26, 2022
  • Last sale: $13,500, June 1966
  • Neighborhood: Westerwood
  • Note: Before its recent renovation, it was one of the most problematic student rentals in the UNCG area (the university is directly across the street).
    • Although it’s advertised as 5 bedrooms, Greensboro zoning prohibits renting to more than four unrelated persons.
    • Out-of-town owner
    • Replacement windows, but the siding and floors are still wood
    • The listing shows only 2,600 square feet.
    • The last time the house was sold, Friendly Avenue was still called Madison Avenue.
    • The property is on a triangular lot, surrounded by student rentals, on a small triangular block squeezed between two major thoroughfares:

3455 McConnell Road, Greensboro
sale pending July 28, 2022

  • $338,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms 2,849 square feet, 1.13 acres
  • Price/square foot: $119
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed July 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $95,000, June 1994
  • Note: The property includes part of a pond shared with a neighboring property.

216 Florence Street, Greensboro
sale pending August 14, 2022

  • $290,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 2,508 square feet, 0.15 acre
  • Price/square foot: $116
  • Built in 1915
  • Listed August 10, 2022
  • Last sale: Not identifiable in online records
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: “In need of extensive repairs.”
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival, Residence, c.19l6”
    • The house doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1918. Insurance agent Erle Harris Austin (1881-1955) and Clara Alleine Brown Austin (1887-1962) were the original owners.
    • By 1920, Dr. Frank Alexander Sharpe (1889-1947) and Martha Burns Sharpe (1895-1973) had bought the house. Frank was a physician. They owned the house until 1931.

1930 Golden Gate Drive, Greensboro

  • $200,000
  • 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,175 square feet, 0.22 acre
  • Price/square foot: $170
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed August 12, 2022
  • Last sale: $155,000, June 2021
  • Neighborhood: McAdoo Heights
  • Note: Renovated/homogenized to eliminate most of the historic character (cheap vinyl windows and siding, etc.).

746 Park Avenue, Greensboro
The William Vance Forbis House
sale pending July 31, 2022

  • $190,000 (originally $250,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,152 square feet, 0.19 acre
  • Price/square foot: $88
  • Built in 1915 (per county, put probably a bit earlier; see note)
  • Listed July 10, 2022
  • Last sale: $38,000, February 1980
  • Neighborhood: Dunleath Historic District (local), Summit Avenue Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: The house clearly needs work on the interior. The low price also may be attributable to the condition of the kitchen and bathrooms (which aren’t shown in the listing) and the air conditioning, which is provided by central air, a heat pump, an attic fan and window units.
    • Oddly, the historic district’s NRHP nomination doesn’t mention the house.
    • The listing says it belonged to “Greensboro’s First Mayor,” an unlikely prospect. The first mayor of Greensboro, Alexander P. Eckel, served from 1859-1863 and died in 1906.
    • The first owner was William Vance Forbis (1879-1950). Greensboro has had two mayors named Forbis. Neither of them appear to have lived here, regardless of what the listing says.
    • William bought the property from the Summit Avenue Building Company in 1912. It remained in his family until 1960. William was a furniture salesman. Ownership passed to his wife, Espie Blanche Shepherd Forbis (1987-1954) upon his death and then to their son Lynn V. Forbis (1917-1966), who sold the house in 1960.

808 Douglas Street, Greensboro

  • $165,000 (originally $175,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 1,616 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $102
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed June 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $70,000, June 2021
  • Neighborhood: Douglas Heights
  • Note: Not owner-occupied

Winston-Salem and Forsyth County

1188 W. 4th Street, Winston-Salem
The Fulton-Hinkle Apartments
sale pending June 28, 2022

  • $589,000
  • Divided into four apartments, all about 1,100 square feet; bedrooms and bathrooms not specified; 4,158 square feet total; 0.37 acre
  • Price/square foot: $142
  • Built in 1918
  • Listed June 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $5,000, December 1934
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: The house was divided into apartments in the 1930s.
    • No central air conditioning
    • District NRHP listing: “This is a large two-story frame house of simple Craftsman style influence typical of many built in the 1910s and 1920s, including some in the West End. It is characterized by a low hip roof with widely overhanging eaves and shaped rafter ends, a front hipped dormer, large twelve-over-one sash windows, a broad central entrance with diamond-muntined sidelights and transom, and front and south side shed-roofed porches with tapered paneled posts on brick plinths and a plain balustrade.
    • “The porches are connected by a corner terrace. The recently added vinyl siding does minimum damage to the integrity of the house.
    • “The property was first listed for taxes by Thomas P. and Nannie Fulton in 1914, and in 1916 they were listed in the city directory at this location. Fulton was secretary-treasurer of the J. G. Fulton Tobacco Co. The Fultons occupied the house through the 1920s. In 1934 D.R., T.C., and Rebecca B. Hinkle, who lived next door, purchased the property, and by 1940 it had begun its many years as the Hinkle Apartments.”
    • The house is being sold by the Hinkles’ heirs.

334 Cascade Avenue, Winston-Salem
The Frazier-Julian House
sale pending July 19, 2022

  • $424,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 1,904 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $223
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed July 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $140,000, February 2001
  • Neighborhood: Washington Park Historic District
  • Note: The house is across the street from Washington Park.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Gable-sided brick Colonial Revival house, three bays wide; gabled and elliptical-arched entrance hood over central entrance with sidelights.
    • “One-story side porch to west supported by square posts, balustraded flat roof, now glass-enclosed. One-story frame rear shed. House reroofed 1940.
    • “Believed to have been built by Frazier (wife Treva Knott), a traveling salesman who later worked for the city. Frazier moved here from a boarding house on North Liberty in 1929, and may have lost this house in the Depression.”
    • Walter K. Frazier, 1899-1942; Treva Tabiatha Knott Frazier, 1899-1983, epitaph on both graves: “The Lord is my shepherd. Psalms:23”
    • “Was also residence of William Graves, prominent attorney, until his death.” William Graves (1892-1937) was the attorney for actress Libby Holman, accused of murdering her husband, Z. Smith Reynolds. Z. Smith was the youngest son of R.J. Reynolds. He died of a gunshot wound to the head. Libby and a close frond of Reynolds were accused of murder. They beat the rap, and no one was convicted in the killing. In the first half of the 20th century, it was considered North Carolina’s Crime of the Century; even now, few cases rival it for that distinction (Jeffery MacDonald, perhaps).
    • Graves was a native of Mount Airy and opened a law practice there after serving in World War I. In 1923 he moved to Winston-Salem and practiced there until his rather early death.
    • From 1940 to 2001, the house was owned by Ira Julian (1905-1995) and Ruth Julian (1906-2004). Ira was an attorney. His brother Maurice was the founder of Julian’s College Shop in Chapel Hill and father of fashion designer Alexander Julian.
    • Ruth Julian was a prominent art collector. Her collection included works by Picasso, Georges Rouault and other major international figures but had a particular focus on North Carolina artists, including Maud Gatewood and Ben Owen.

1124 West End Boulevard, Winston-Salem
The Miller-Hancock House
listing expired December 19, 2018; relisted May 20, 2022
listing withdrawn June 23, 2022
relisted July 12, 2022

  • $400,000 (originally listed at $249,000, later $379,999)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,545 square feet (per county), 0.22 acre
  • Price/square foot: $157
  • Built in 1911
  • Listed for sale five times since August 2010
  • Last sale: $151,500, July 2007
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District
  • Note: The owner has been trying to sell it, off and on, for 12 years at prices ranging from $149,000 to, now, $400,000.
    • Rental property
    • District NRHP nomination: “This Colonial Revival cottage is a one-and-a-half-story weatherboarded frame house with a clipped gable roof.
      • It features a hipped front dormer, a glass and wood paneled entrance with sidelights, a facade porch with Tuscan columns and a plain balustrade, steep wooden steps to the porch, and a high brick porch foundation with large south-facing windows.
      • “Like many of the houses on the street, it has a stone retaining wall bordering the front yard and stone front steps.
      • “Mary Eva Miller purchased the property in 1910, and the 1917 Sanborn map shows that the house had been built by that time. The 1918 city directory — the first to cover this area of West End Blvd. — lists Paul L. Miller, a contractor, and his wife, Eva, as residing at this location.
      • “They occupied the house through 1935 and sold it to Thomas W. and Alice B. Hancock in 1941.” The Hancocks occupied the house at least until 1975. By 1986 the house was a rental. The family retained ownership of the property until July 2007.

1172 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston-Salem
sale pending July 21, 2022

  • $399,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,928 square feet, 0.21 acre
  • Price/square foot: $136
  • Built in 1925 (possibly later; see note)
  • Listed July 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $175,000, August 2004
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Period Cottage. Two and a half story; front gable; aluminum siding; shed-roof side dormers; six-light transom over single-light windows; gable-roof hood on knee braces with arched opening; side porch; front gable projection; bay window.”
    • The address doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1929, listed as vacant. In 1930, the occupant is listed as M. Elwood Tatum, general yard supervisor for Southern Railway.

1182 W. 4th Street, Winston-Salem
The Dull-Hinkle House
sale pending July 13, 2022

  • $365,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,939 square feet (per county), 0.35 acre
  • Price/square foot: $124
  • Built in 1911
  • Listed July 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $26,500, December 1986
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: The listing shows 3,275 square feet.
    • Listing: “Multiple garage spaces and outbuildings”
  • District NRHP nomination: “The Dull-Hinkle House is a late Victorian dwelling of simple Queen Anne style influence. The two-story frame hip-roofed house is dominated by a boldly projecting right front polygonal bay with a decoratively shingled gable and sawnwork corner brackets.
    • “Sanborn maps show that the porch, with its turned posts and balustrade and sawnwork brackets, originally wrapped around the north side of the house, but this side was enclosed at an undetermined date. In recent years the house was sheathed with vinyl siding, but this and the alteration of the porch have not destroyed its architectural character.
    • “The house was included on the 1912 Sanborn Hap, and the following year G.L. Dull was listed in the city directory at this location. He occupied the house through at least 1920. In 1932 D.R. and Rebecca B. Hinkle purchased the property, and the house remains in family ownership and occupancy [as of October 1986].”

905 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston-Salem

  • $344,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,904 square feet, 0.15 acre
  • Price/square foot: $181
  • Built in 1937
  • Listed July 15, 2022
  • Las sale: $213,000, August 2020
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District
  • Realtor babble: “Pinterest-worthy”
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival. Two story; side gable; vinyl siding; six-over-six, replacement sash; shed-roof porch; square posts; multi-light door.”

8076 Broad Street, Rural Hall, Forsyth County
sale pending June 29, 2022
no longer under contract July 12, 2022

  • $274,900 (originally $279,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,470 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $111
  • Built in 1891
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: $153,000, February 2016
  • Listing: “The ‘Rev. Smoak House’, this historic home has a fascinating story …” I wonder what it is. The listing doesn’t say, and the house isn’t listed in any of the usual sources. Internet searches turn up nothing, either.

2401 Urban Street, Winston-Salem

  • $129,900 (originally $144,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,104 square feet, 0.10 acre
  • Price/square foot: $62
  • Built in 1900 (possibly later; see note)
  • Listed July 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $76,000, July 2018
  • Neighborhood: Belview, Waughtown-Belview Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Urban Street doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1915.
    • The property has been sold seven times in this century.
    • This property’s original address was 201 Urban Street.
    • The store was operated by I.L. Campbell in 1915; J.B. Whitley, 1916-22; Daisy M. Williamson, 1923-37; William B. Wicker, 1938; James T. Lawrence, 1939-1959; and others later. It was a grocery store through at least 1963.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Another prominent building in the Belview area of the district is a rare example of a two-story store/house combination located at 2401 Urban Street. … Although altered with vinyl siding, the building is a rare example of a frame commercial building in the district.”
    • “Two-story; hip roof; vinyl siding; recessed entry; upper level porch; one-over-one windows. Appears on 1917 Sanborn map.”

Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties

8587 Lindley Mill Road, Snow Camp, Alamance County

  • $975,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,852 square feet, 42 acres
  • Price/square foot: $526
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: 1909 or earlier, price unknown
  • Note: The house may have been built by farmer Amos Julius Richardson (1854-1938). In 1909 ownership passed to two of his children, eight-year-old Arthur Wilbert Richardson (1901-1983) and Daisy Richardson (1884-1971). Arthur’s son Ralph Gray Richardson (1933-2021) inherited the farm in 1983. It being sold by his heirs.
    • Ralph was a graduate of Eli Whitney High School and Burlington Business College. He was a beef and chicken farmer and also worked at Western Electric and the UNC-Chapel Hill public safety department. He was an Army veteran of the Korean War.

1734 Lick Fork Creek Road, Ruffin, Rockingham County
sale pending July 6, 2022

  • $689,000 (originally $749,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,806 square feet, 19.75 acres
  • Price/square foot: $267
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed June 10, 2022
  • Last sale: $244,000, September 2002
  • Note: Formerly Pennini Vineyards, which grew vinifera grapes including Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Viogner.
    • The property includes a guest cottage and an in-ground swimming pool.

283 S. N.C. Highway 62, Yanceyville, Caswell County
listing withdrawn February 5, 2022; relisted February 7, 2022
listing withdrawn April 11, 2022
relisted April 12, 2022

  • $580,900 (originally $629,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,025 square feet, 2.22 acres
  • Price/square foot: $192
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed April 14, 2021
  • Last sale: $133,000, May 2003
  • Note: The property includes a guest house, 688 square feet.
    • The house is immediately south of Bartlett Yancey High School.

1622 Saddle Club Road, Mebane, Orange County

  • $525,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,389 square feet, 3.35 acres
  • Price/square foot: $220
  • Built in 1912
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $126,000, May 2021
  • Note: The property is just over the Alamance-Orange county line north of Lake Michael.

518 Fountain Place, Burlington, Alamance County
The Atwater-Pyne House
sale pending July 1-14, 2022
sale pending July 19, 2022

  • $525,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,972 square feet, 0.56 acre
  • Price/square foot: $132
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed June 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $365,000, April 2016
  • Neighborhood: West Davis Street-Fountain Place Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Home of J. Minetree Pyne and Jessie Ormand Pyne from 1963 to 1997 (owned by Alamance County Hospital 1963-1980 and by the Pynes 1980-1997). James Minetree Pyne (1917-1994) served as administrator of Alamance County Hospital from 1956 to 1980. He was a member of the first Alamance County Historical Commission. Preservation Burlington gives an annual award bearing his name to outstanding restorations of historic homes.
    • The property includes a detached three-car garage.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Built ca. 1925 for James Atwater, president of the Alamance Lumber Company, this two-story frame structure exhibits many of the hallmarks of the Colonial Revival style of architecture used for Period Houses of the 1920s and 1930s.
    • “Featuring a three-bay facade, the house has a side gable roof with a simple box cornice and now is clad in aluminum siding. Palladian windows light the attic area from the gable ends, and one-story side wings with flat balustraded roofs create a Georgian configuration.
    • “Single, stepped shoulder brick chimneys rise between the central block and the wings. Eight-over-twelve windows with five-light sidelights flank the classical entrance; the latter has an elliptical fanlight and four-pane sidelights and is sheltered by a gable-roofed single-bay entrance porch with paired Roman Doric columns.
    • “The house is situated at the center of a double lot and faces the fountain for which the street is named.”
    • Atwater (1982-1958) lived in the house until his death. It was sold to Alamance County Hospital after the death of his wife, Lillian Anderson Atwater (1876-1961).

1205 Huntsdale Road, Reidsville, Rockingham County
The Fred and Annie Klenner House
sale pending July 30

  • $449,900
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,870 square feet, 0.81 acre
  • Price/square foot: $116
  • Built in 1942
  • Listed July 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $300,000, October 2018
  • Note: French Country-style home, relatively uncommon around here
    • The original owners of the house were Dr. Frederick Robert Klenner Sr. (1907-1984) and Anne Hill Sharp Klenner (1914-2003). They married in 1937 and bought the property for $2,200 in 1941.
    • There’s so much to say about Fred and Annie and, especially, their son, Frederick Jr., nicknamed Fritz. Fred, though, deserves attention in his own right. This is condensed from their pages on findagrave.com, for which someone has provided quite a bit of information:
    • Fred was a physician and a pioneering researcher on vitamin C. He was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania; in 1936 he graduated from the Duke University School of Medicine. Annie was a nurse at Duke Hospital. They settled in her hometown of Reidsville, where Fred began practicing medicine. Annie worked in the practice. She was an active garden club member and flower show judge as well.
    • One of Annie’s sisters was Susie Sharp, the first woman to serve as chief justice of the N.C. Supreme Court. If this is starting to sound familiar, you may be getting a bit queasy, but Dr. Klenner’s career is worth knowing about and tends to get lost in the gory details involving their horrible son.
    • “Beginning in the 1940s, Dr. Klenner began experimenting with megadoses of vitamins, mostly vitamin C, to treat a variety of medical disorders. From infants to the elderly, Klenner used large doses of vitamins to treat a wide range of medical disorders including polio and multiple sclerosis. His research of those treatments inspired others, including Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling.
    • “In the 1988 Clinical Guide, Pauling is quoted as saying, ‘The early papers by Dr. Fred R. Klenner provide much information about the use of large doses of Vitamin C in preventing and treating many diseases. These papers are still important.’
    • “While practicing medicine, he published 27 papers about the benefits of vitamin C therapy for over 30 diseases.
    • “Then on May 23, 1946, Dr. Klenner made national headlines when he delivered the world’s first set of surviving identical black quadruplets, the Fultz Sisters, at the Annie Penn Hospital in Reidsville. In his opinion, Klenner attributed their survival to massive doses of vitamins that he administered to the babies while under his medical care.”
    • Unsurprisingly, many local doctors thought Fred was nuts. He claimed, though, that he treated over 10,000 patients with massive doses of vitamins over 30 years without any ill effects.
    • For better or worse, Fred died in 1984, missing the horror that was to come. Annie lived through it, dying at age 89 in 2003.
    • At some point in the early 1980s, their only child, Fritz (1952-1985), took up with his divorced first cousin, Susie Newsome (her mother was a sister of Annie Sharp Klenner and Susie Sharp). Susie Newsome was involved in an unpleasant custody dispute with her ex-husband, who also was from Reidsville but by then was living in New Mexico. Police believe it was Fritz who murdered Annie’s former mother-in-law and sister-in-law in 1984 and then her parents and grandmother in May 1985. On June 3, 1985, the pair killed her two young sons and, while being chased by police, died by blowing up their car with dynamite on N.C. 150 in Guilford County.

403 S. 2nd Avenue, Mayodan, Rockingham County

  • $369,000 (originally $389,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet, 0.80 acre
  • Price/square foot: $134
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 11, 2022
  • Last sale: $265,000, March 2021
  • Neighborhood: Washington Mills
  • Note: Renovations have added cheap vinyl siding and replacement windows.
    • The property has two outbuildings.
    • Washington Mills, less than a block away, originally owned the house. The company sold it to private owners in 1964. The listing says the house had been the home of the company president. The plant opened in 1896 as Mayo Mills.

615 Piedmont Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
sale pending, July 3, 2022
no longer under contract July 11, 2022

  • $349,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,445 square feet, 0.55 acre
  • Price/square foot: $
  • Built in 1922
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $95,000, February 2022
  • Neighborhood: Old Post Road Historic District (local), Reidsville Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: A previous listing said the property included an in-ground pool.
    • Oddly, the historic district’s National Register nomination doesn’t mention the house.

331 Maple Avenue, Reidsville, Rockingham County
The Dr. Samuel G. Jett House
sale pending July 27, 2022

  • $253,000 (originally $255,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3,901 square feet, 0.27 acre
  • Price/square foot: $65
  • Built in 1918
  • Listed June 4, 2022
  • Last sale: $165,000, March 2022
  • Neighborhood: Old Post Road Historic District (local), Reidsville Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Three-month turn-around time for what the listing calls a “Full Home Renovation!”
    • District NRHP nomination: “Built before 1922 for physician and city health officer Dr. Samuel G. Jett, this large and relatively intact bungalow has many distinctive features.
    • “The main body of the square, one and one-half story frame residence is clad in weatherboard siding, while wood shingles cover the gable ends and nearly full-facade shed and gable dormer. Paired casement windows light the dormer, while a variety of nine over one fifteen over one sash and multi-paned casements are found in the rest of the house.
    • “Stuccoed arches spring from heavy brick piers to the engaged porch roof which continues from the side gable roof with its deep bracketed overhang.
    • “The house stands near the front of a typical narrow, but deep, well-shaded lot.”

519 Central Avenue, Burlington, Alamance County
sale pending July 2, 2022

  • $240,000 (originally $250,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,924 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $125
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed June 2, 2022
  • Last sale: $160,000, August 2008
  • Note: The listing describes the house as “move-in ready” but shows no photos of the interior.

101 W. Academy Street, Madison, Rockingham County
The Pratt-Van Noppen House

  • $199,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,350 square feet, 0.36 acre
  • Price/square foot: $85
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $200,000, September 2016
  • Neighborhood: Academy Street Historic District
  • Listing: “Zoned for business and/or residential use.” County tax records describe it as an office building.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story frame T-shaped house with two tall interior brick chimneys.
    • “Distinguishing features are a two-story, three-sided bay in projecting gabled wing of facade, richly carved pendant brackets all along the roofline, and classical details, including Tuscan porch columns and molded architraves topped by boxed heads above doors and windows.
    • “Thomas Ruffin Pratt (1856-1937), prominent local civic and business leader, had the house built during the 1890s. The current [as of 1980] owner is Pratt’s grandson.”
    • Thomas and Maybud Julia Pratt (1861-1932) had at least four children. Ownership of the house apparently passed to the eldest, Annie Pearl Pratt Van Noppen (1886-1968). Her husband, John James Van Noppen II (1871-1919), was a first-generation Dutch American and a dentist in Spray. He died in the Spanish Flu pandemic.
    • Annie was a teacher and contributed articles to Madison’s newspaper, The Messenger, including a series on historic homes along the Dan River in Rockingham County. After John’s death at age 47, she never remarried and outlived him by 49 years.
    • From Thomas’s findagrave.com listing: “Thomas and his brother, Charles Benton Pratt, operated a general merchandise store located in the south half of the Carter-Moir Hardware Store.
    • “The two-story building that housed their general merchandise store is located in the Leaksville Commercial Historic District and is included in the National Register of Historic Places. It is a two-story brick building built in the 1880’s and noted for its decorative brickwork. The building may also have housed the Bank of Leaksville, chartered in 1889.
    • “In the 1890’s Thomas built a two-story T-shaped house at 101 W. Academy Street noted for richly carved brackets and classical details. Thomas also sold insurance. His other business pursuits included a brick manufacturing plant and a mortuary.
    • “He served as a Rockingham County Commissioner and was involved in the infamous story of Rockingham County’s ‘Bridge to Nowhere‘, a bridge built in 1929 across the Dan River with no approaches or connecting roads. Thomas was the chairman of the Rockingham County [Board of Commissioners] when the contract was approved for building the bridge. That resulted in a lengthy and famous lawsuit between the county and the builders, Luten Bridge Company.”
    • In an entertaining academic legal paper, the Luten Bridge/Mebane Bridge case is recounted as “a remarkable story, one that arose within a heated tax revolt pitting the county’s farmers against its most celebrated industrialist. Much more than a crisp illustration of the duty to mitigate, Rockingham County v. The Luten Bridge Co. offers a window into a southern community’s struggles with a divided social order, the introduction of wealth into local politics, and a changing economy.”

527 Barnes Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
sale pending June 5 to July 2, 2022
listing withdrawn July 2, 2022

  • $194,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 2,032 square feet, 0.45 acre
  • Price/square foot: $96
  • Built in 1909
  • Listed May 30, 2022
  • Last sale: $30,000, November 1995
  • Note: Cheaply renovated with vinyl siding and vinyl replacement windows

200 N.C. Highway 700, Eden, Rockingham County
sale pending July 30, 2022

  • $174,500
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,300 square feet, 2.56 acres
  • Price/square foot: $134
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $5,000, October 1998
  • Note: Located northwest of Eden, just off N.C 87.
    • The property includes a workshop, barn, gazebo, storage building, and a detached carport.

939 Galloway Street, Eden, Rockingham County

  • $90,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,714 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $53
  • Built in 1912
  • Listed July 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $49,000, September 2016

Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties

319 Granite Street, Mount Airy, Surry County

  • $599,000 (originally $619,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,280 square feet, 0.67 acre
  • Price/square foot: $183
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $128,000, May 2007
  • Neighborhood: Mount Airy Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Picturesque one-and-one half story English cottage style stuccoed house with a steep front gable over the right (west) bays and engaged porch sweeping across the left of the main elevation and extending to form a porte-cochere.
    • “A shed-roofed dormer is lighted by a band of six-light casement windows. The round arched entryway to the porch is repeated in a ‘garden gate’ entrance at the extreme right where the front gable extends almost to the ground.”
    • The National Register description mentions “a fanciful garden gazebo” in the backyard, but it doesn’t appear to have survived.

414 Will Boone Road, Mocksville, Davie County

  • $529,900 (originally $549,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,318 square feet (per county), 35.83 acres (two tracts)
  • Price/square foot: $229
  • Built in 1903
  • Listed June 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $144,000, August 1999
  • Note: The listing shows 2,482 square feet.
    • “The exterior features a large in-ground saltwater pool possibly in need of a new liner. Numerous storage and outbuildings.”

579 S. Salisbury Street, Mocksville, Davie County

  • $420,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3,103 square feet, 0.73 acre
  • Price/square foot: $135
  • Built in 1905
  • Listed July 22, 2022
  • Last sale: $85,000, April 2018
  • Neighborhood: Salisbury Street Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Surprisingly, the house isn’t mentioned in the district NRHP nomination or in The Historic Architecture of Davie County.

484 S. Salisbury Street, Mocksville, Davie County
The Hall-Call House

  • $375,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3,207 square feet (per county), 1.03 acres
  • Price/square foot: $117
  • Built circa 1828
  • Listed August 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $190,000, March 2014
  • Neighborhood: Salisbury Street Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: The listing shows only 2,885 square feet.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Three-bay, vigorous vernacular Italianate house; original log house probably built by Reverend William A. Hall of Joppa Church about 1828;
  • “purchased in 1871 by carpenter Samuel M. Call and wife Sallie, remodelled by Call;
  • “rear ell and gabled appendages added; semi-octagonal bay constructed on south elevation with hipped porch over it;
  • “hipped front porch with chamfered posts, trellis railings, flush-sheathed wall; six over six sash; bracketted cornice;
  • “step-shouldered exterior chimney on north elevation; standing seam metal roof;
  • “rear ell raised to two stories by daughter Martha Call ca. 1930.”

3577 N.C. Highway 8 & 65 Road, Germanton, Stokes County
listing expired April 3, 2020; relisted July 5, 2022
sale pending July 28, 2022

  • $365,000 (originally $244,900)
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,297 square feet (per county), 0.71 acre
  • Price/square foot: $111
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed October 1, 2019
  • Last sale: $130,000, August 2017
  • Note: The 2019 listing said there were four bedrooms.
    • Eight fireplaces

220 Church Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
The Weldon and Nell Parker House

  • $360,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,496 square feet (per county), 0.33 acre
  • Price/square foot: $144
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $98,500, September 1999
  • Neighborhood: Mount Airy Historic District
  • Note: The property includes a detached garage.
    • The listing shows only 2,300 square feet.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story boxy house of novelty vinyl-sided frame construction with an asphalt-shingled hip roof. On the front of the roof is a hipped dormer.
    • “The one-story front porch has replacement fluted square wood columns in twos and threes on a solid railing. The granite porch steps have brick cheeks.
    • “Other features include two interior chimneys, replacement windows, a replacement front door, a brick foundation, and a one-story rear wing.
    • “A concrete tire strip driveway leads to a back garage. The address was formerly 185 W. Church.”
    • The earliest identifiable residents were James Weldon Parker (1899-1966) and Nell Irene Saunders Parker (1899-1983). Weldon was a clerk at the W.E. Merritt Company, a wholesale and retail hardware supplier. The Parkers remained in the house until at least until Weldon’s death in 1966.

174 W. Poplar Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
sale pending August 13, 2022

  • $295,000 (originally $320,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $107
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 31, 2022
  • Last sales: $245,000 on September 16, 2021; $196,000, September 2020
  • Neighborhood: Lebanon Hills Historic District
  • Note: The house was previously listed with three bedrooms.
  • District National Register nomination: “A swooping asymmetrical front-gable roof is the defining feature of this two-story Tudor Revival house, which is frame with a textured stucco finish. The swooping part of the roof engages a corner entry porch with segmental-arched openings.
    • “Above is a picturesque segmental-arched casement window; other windows are six-over-one wood sash with a few one-over-one replacement sashes.
    • “At the top of the front and side gables is false half-timbering with cruck (curved) members. Other features include an exterior chimney with sloped shoulders on the east side, asphalt-shingle roofing, a wood panel front door, a modern shed-roofed back porch, and a wall along the east lot line with a granite pillar at the sidewalk.”

123 Kirby Road, King, Stokes County

  • $259,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2,023 square feet, 0.93 acre
  • Price/square foot: $128
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed July 12, 2022
  • Last sale: $155,000, September 2002

Davidson, Randolph, Montgomery and Chatham Counties

1130 Fairview Drive, Lexington, Davidson County

  • $599,000
  • 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,245 square feet, 7.05 acres
  • Price/square foot: $185
  • Built in 1940
  • Listed May 27, 2022
  • Last sale: $155,000, May 2021
  • Note: No information is given regarding the substantial renovations the property must have undergone. However, many rooms appear to have cheap vinyl replacement flooring, there appear to be cheap replacement windows throughout the house, and sloppy brick repairs mar the front. A generator and an air conditioning unit are located at the front of the house, unusual placement for such utilities, especially on such an expensive house.
    • The listing shows 7.52 acres.
    • County records show a second house on the property (3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,553 square feet, built in 1950). That building, if it still exists, isn’t mentioned in the listing or seen in the photos.

2882 Old Lexington Road, Asheboro, Randolph County
formerly the Maple Grove Dairy house
sale pending July 31, 2022

  • $469,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,401 square feet, 3.85 acres
  • Price/square foot: $196
  • Built in 1880
  • Listed July 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $277,000, July 2017
  • Note: The property includes a guest house and a two-car garage.
    • Located northwest of the town near Lake Lucas, a municipal lake created in 1943. “Most of the dairy pasture land is now under water, but the Maple Grove Dairy house itself still stands at 2882 Old Lexington Road.” (Notes on the History of Randolph County, NC)

8 Vance Street, Lexington, Davidson County
sale pending July 16, 2022

  • $420,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 4,209 square feet, 0.49 acre
  • Price/square foot: $100
  • Built in 1927 per county but probably by 1916 (see note below)
  • Listed July 8, 2022
  • Last sale: $324,500, April 2020
  • Neighborhood: Lexington Residential Historic District
  • Something you don’t see every day: The property includes “two 100+ year old Deodar Cedar trees recognized by the Lexington Treasured Tree program”
  • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story, weatherboarded, side-gable-roofed Queen Anne/Colonial Revival with a one-and-one-half- story, hip-roofed addition with a large, gabled wall dormer on the front of the dwelling; full-width front porch with Doric columns spanned by a wood railing, a pediment over the entrance and a square corner gazebo with a pyramidal roof; 1/1 sash, single-leaf French door with sidelights and transom, brick interior chimneys with corbelled stacks, wood-shingled gables, rear porch with paneled posts.
    • “This dwelling appears on the 1916-17 city directory map and is illustrated on the 1923 Sanborn in its current form. Jacob A. and Fannie H. Lindsay occupied the house in 1925-26. Mr. Lindsay was the secretary-treasurer of Lexington Home Furnishing Company.”

208 Raleigh Avenue, Unit B, Liberty, Randolph County

  • $315,000 (originally $325,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,388 square feet (per county), 0.64 acre
  • Price/square foot: $132
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed July 26, 2022
  • Last sale: $82,500, July 1998
  • Note: It’s a single-family residence, so the “Unit B” designation is meaningless.
    • The listing shows 2,601 square feet.
    • The listing says it’s “loaded with so much character,” but it has cheap replacement windows and vinyl siding.
    • The property includes and 18 foot-by-18 foot outdoor kitchen in the backyard.

116 E. Naomi Street, Randleman, Randolph County
listing withdrawn July 14, 2022

  • $275,000 (originally $450,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom, 2,330 square feet, 1.2 acres
  • Price/square foot: $118
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed February 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $45,000, October 1988
  • Note: Vinyl siding