National Register Properties

Updated February 8, 2021

Recent sales

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132 Becktown Road, Mocksville, Davie County
Boxwood Lodge
Boxwood Lodge NRHP
Blog post — Boxwood Lodge: An Elegant National Register Mansion-Wedding Venue-B&B near Mocksville, $3.45 million

  • $3.45 million
  • 10 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms and two half-bathrooms, 9,304 square feet, 48.23 acres
  • Price/square foot: $372
  • Built in 1934
  • Listed January 17, 2019
  • Last sale: $782,500, March 2002
  • Note: The house was designed by Delano & Aldrich of New York.
    • The property is what remains of a 1,500-acre hunting retreat developed from 1911 to 1931 by William Rabb Craig, a New York cotton and sugar broker who died in 1931. Craig’s widow built the house on the site of a hunting lodge built in the 1910’s.
    • The listing says a $5 million restoration of the house was completed in 2007.
    • The property includes a guest cabin built in 1933, a barn built in the 1910’s and a pond.
    • It is now a bed and breakfast and a wedding/event venue.

3550 Middlebrook Drive, Clemmons, Forsyth County
The Philip and Johanna Hoehns (Hanes) House
listing expired October 17, 2020
relisted January 6, 2021

  • $1.879 million (originally $1.95 million)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,839 square feet, 8.26 acres
  • Price/square foot: $662
  • Built in 1798 (per NRHP nomination)
  • Listed August 12, 2020
  • Last sale: $275,000, February 2014
  • Note: The house was built by the Hanes family’s first ancestor in Forsyth County.
    • NRHP nomination: “In the late 1940s, the interior of the house was remodeled according to plans prepared by Winston-Salem architect William Roy Wallace. When the present owners renovated the house in 2014-2015, they restored some of the original features based on physical evidence, retained some of the 1940s features when there was no evidence of earlier treatments, and made a few changes based on personal taste. … Even with the alterations of the 1940s and 2014-2015, the house still strongly projects the feeling of a substantial and sophisticated dwelling from the turn of the nineteenth century in Forsyth County.”
    • The 2014-15 renovation included the construction of a one-story addition behind the house, connected to the original structure by a hallway. “Although large, the one-story frame addition was designed and built to be as sensitive as possible to the historic character of the original house and to have the least impact on it. Among other things, the addition housed a new kitchen and two bathrooms, so that these facilities did not interrupt the original fabric of the house.” (NRHP nomination)
    • The property is subject to a historic preservation and conservation covenant held by Preservation North Carolina.
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1700 Richardson Drive, Reidsville
Belmont, The Robert Payne Richardson Jr. House
The Robert Payne Richardson Houses Historic District
listing withdrawn July 1, 2015, relisted October 10, 2015
listing withdrawn December 1, 2016, relisted April 5, 2017
listing withdrawn October 1, 2017, relisted June 13, 2018

  • $950,000 (originally $1.495 million)
  • 6 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 8,946 square feet, 8.67 acres
  • Price/square foot: $106
  • Built in 1912
  • Original listing date was before July 2015; current listings dn’t go back any further.
  • Last sale: Unclear in online records
  • Note: Belmont is one of the three Richardson family homes comprising the principal structures of the Robert Payne Richardson Houses Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places. The district consists of 22 buildings and structures on about 30 acres near downtown Reidsville.
    • Listing: “The home has been completely restored … currently being used as a private residence and venue for weddings and other events.”
    • County property records say the house has 8,946 square feet. A current listing lists that figure and an additional 3,332 unfinished square feet for a total of 12,278.
  • $475,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,594 square feet, 0.65 acre
  • Price/square foot: $132
  • Built in 1893
  • Listed January 19, 2021
  • Last sale: $349,000, March 2011
  • NRHP nomination: “Its irregular massing, variety of surface materials, and rich ornamentation create a sophisticated late Victorian house of the Queen Anne style. Located at the south comer of McNeill and Barrett streets only two blocks from the county courthouse, the J.C. Black House is set back from McNeill Street on an L-shaped, flat lot. The facade of the house is sheltered from the street by a row of trees composed of hollys, pines, oaks, and one large magnolia. Other trees and shrubs are scattered around the property, but in no formal pattern. A low stone wall dating from 1937 borders the yard on the front and northeast sides.”
    • “While the interior of the house has seen modest alterations through the years, the exterior remains largely intact with only a few minor changes. As a whole, the J.C. Black House retains a high degree of integrity in terms of location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.”
    • “J. C. Black (1850-1902), who had broad political and commercial commitments in Moore County, was one of the most prominent men of his day in Carthage. A lawyer by profession, he served for years as Moore County attorney. Black was a strong promoter of economic growth in Carthage. Not only was he the leading spirit in the building of the Carthage Railroad in the mid 1880s, serving as its first president, but he was also one of the organizers and first stockholders of the Bank of Carthage.”
    • “Having been built during the pinnacle of Black’s career, his house survives as the consummate physical expression of his productive life and, in particular, his significance in the areas of commerce and politics/government. During the decade between the ca. 1893 construction of the house and Black’s death in 1902, J. C. Black represented Moore and Randolph counties in the state senate, served as mayor of Carthage, and was president of the Bank of Carthage. No other property attesting to his local importance survives.”
    • “After Black’s death, the house remained in family ownership and occupancy for nearly a century.”