National Register Properties

Updated April 26, 2021

Piedmont Triad Region
Not Too Far Away

Recent sales

Piedmont Triad Region

3550 Middlebrook Drive, Clemmons, Forsyth County
The Philip and Johanna Hoehns (Hanes) House
listing expired October 17, 2020
relisted January 6, 2021

  • $1.879 million (originally $1.95 million)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,839 square feet, 8.26 acres
  • Price/square foot: $662
  • Built in 1798 (per NRHP nomination)
  • Listed August 12, 2020
  • Last sale: $275,000, February 2014
  • Note: The house was built by the Hanes family’s first ancestor in Forsyth County.
    • NRHP nomination: “In the late 1940s, the interior of the house was remodeled according to plans prepared by Winston-Salem architect William Roy Wallace. When the present owners renovated the house in 2014-2015, they restored some of the original features based on physical evidence, retained some of the 1940s features when there was no evidence of earlier treatments, and made a few changes based on personal taste. … Even with the alterations of the 1940s and 2014-2015, the house still strongly projects the feeling of a substantial and sophisticated dwelling from the turn of the nineteenth century in Forsyth County.”
    • The 2014-15 renovation included the construction of a one-story addition behind the house, connected to the original structure by a hallway. “Although large, the one-story frame addition was designed and built to be as sensitive as possible to the historic character of the original house and to have the least impact on it. Among other things, the addition housed a new kitchen and two bathrooms, so that these facilities did not interrupt the original fabric of the house.” (NRHP nomination)
    • The property is subject to a historic preservation and conservation covenant held by Preservation North Carolina.

112 N. Stratford Road, Winston-Salem
The Thurmond and Lucy Hanes Chatham House
National Register of Historic Places
listing withdrawn August 5, 2019
relisted March 18, 2021

  • $1.8 million (originally $1.45 million, later $2.1 million)
  • 6 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, 9,872 square feet, 2.72 acres
  • Price/square foot: $182
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed April 30, 2019
  • Last sale: $1.325 million, April 5, 2019
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
  • Note: Designated as a Forsyth County Landmark
    • Designed by Charles Barton Keen and William Roy Wallace for a couple whose marriage united two major Winston-Salem textile families, the Chathams (Chatham Manufacturing) and the Hanes (Hanes Hosiery and P.F. Hanes Knitting Company).
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1700 Richardson Drive, Reidsville
Belmont, The Robert Payne Richardson Jr. House
The Robert Payne Richardson Houses Historic District
listing withdrawn July 1, 2015, relisted October 10, 2015
listing withdrawn December 1, 2016, relisted April 5, 2017
listing withdrawn October 1, 2017, relisted June 13, 2018
listing withdrawn April 24, 2021

  • $950,000 (originally $1.495 million)
  • 6 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 8,946 square feet, 8.67 acres
  • Price/square foot: $106
  • Built in 1912
  • Original listing date was before July 2015; current listings dn’t go back any further.
  • Last sale: Unclear in online records
  • Note: Belmont is one of the three Richardson family homes comprising the principal structures of the Robert Payne Richardson Houses Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places. The district consists of 22 buildings and structures on about 30 acres near downtown Reidsville.
    • Listing: “The home has been completely restored … currently being used as a private residence and venue for weddings and other events.”
    • County property records say the house has 8,946 square feet. A current listing lists that figure and an additional 3,332 unfinished square feet for a total of 12,278.

1056 N. Main Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
The Edgar Harvey Hennis House

  • $649,900
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,798 square feet, 0.78 acre
  • Price/square foot: $171
  • Built in 1909
  • Listed March 15, 2021
  • Last sale: $187,000, August 2017
  • Neighborhood: Lebanon Hill Historic District
  • Listing: “The main home has 4 BR’s & 2 full baths; Formal LR, DR, Den, & Southern Kitchen. The upper level has a separate kitchen, to allow for multipurpose living, & lots of unfinished attic space which could easily convert to more living area or baths. The Carriage House has a fully functional apartment for separate living space, & a 2-3 car garage.”
    • National Register nomination: “The Edgar Harvey Hennis House is significant both architecturally and for its historical associations. Located at 1056 North Main Street in Mount Airy, the house is a handsome, intact example of early twentieth century design reflecting influences of the late Victorian and Colonial Revival styles. The large, well-detailed, asymmetrical one-and-one-half story brick veneer house features multiple projecting shingled gables with Palladian and round-arch windows, projecting bays, windows with beveled glass transoms, a generous, U-shaped wrap-around porch and a wealth of original interior decorative woodwork, mantelpieces and hardware. Granite, the hallmark Mount Airy building material, is used for window sills and lintels, porch plinths, foundation, and retaining wall.
    • “Constructed in 1909, the Hennis House is the earliest known residence built on Lebanon Hill. Lebanon Hill was a center of early Mount Airy suburban development from the 1910s through the mid-1930s. Located approximately three-quarters of a mile north of the central business district, Lebanon Hill was the site from 1831 to c. 1858 of the town’s first Methodist Church.
    • “The house was constructed for Edgar Harvey Hennis (1884-1965), a prominent early Mount Airy businessman, horse trader and, later, long-time owner of the town’s Chrysler automobile dealership. Hennis’ wife, Susan (1883-1983) owned the house until her death. The house remained virtually unltered during their seventy-four year occupation. The present owner has preserved the house and sensitively renovated the kitchen, baths and attic space.

Not Too Far Away

710 N. Lafayette Street, Shelby, Cleveland County
The James Heyward Hull House

  • $800,000
  • 8 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms, 5,869 square feet, 1.4 acres
  • Price/square foot: $136
  • Built in 1874 (see note below)
  • Listed November 9, 2019
  • Last sale: $37,000, April 1984
  • Note: The current real-estate listings for the house show 1840 as its date. The National Register nomination says 1874; county records show 1900, which seems the least likely.
    • The house has been in the Hull-Daniel family for 115 years.
    • NRHP nomination: “The James Heyward Hull House [is] an excellent example of a 1907 Neoclassical Revival style dwelling in Shelby, one of several built at the turn of the century by some of Shelby’s most prominent residents. The large two-story house was originally built ca. 1874 in the Italianate style for Methodist minister Hilary T. Hudson. James Heyward Hull, a cotton broker, bought the house in 1907 and had it transformed into a Neoclassical Revival style house by adding a monumental portico, flanking wings, an ornate deck-on-hip roof, and completely redoing the interior.”
    • “The residential Neoclassical Revival style was a monumental version of classical elements that became very popular among wealthy industrialists in North Carolina during the bustling “New South” era of the early twentieth century. Also known as ‘Southern Colonial,’ the principal feature was a colossal central portico with one-story porches extending out to the sides. Other characteristic elements of the style were the two-story massing and richly detailed classical columns, entrances, and eaves. The popularity of the style caused it to be chosen as the form for the North Carolina Building at the 1907 Jamestown Tercentennial Exposition in Norfolk, Virginia. The style came to be associated with the ‘new’ southern aristocracy, the cotton mill owners, cotton brokers, and cotton planters.” (footnote in original: “Bishir, Catherine W. North Carolina Architecture. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1990, pp. 420-423″)