National Register Properties

Updated October 18, 2021

Piedmont Triad Region
Not Too Far Away

Recent sales

Piedmont Triad Region

3550 Middlebrook Drive, Clemmons, Forsyth County
The Philip and Johanna Hoehns (Hanes) House
listing expired October 17, 2020
relisted January 6, 2021

  • $1.695 million (originally $1.95 million)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,839 square feet, 8.26 acres
  • Price/square foot: $597
  • Built in 1798 (per NRHP nomination)
  • Listed August 12, 2020
  • Last sale: $275,000, February 2014
  • Note: The house was built by the Hanes family’s first ancestor in Forsyth County.
    • NRHP nomination: “In the late 1940s, the interior of the house was remodeled according to plans prepared by Winston-Salem architect William Roy Wallace. When the present owners renovated the house in 2014-2015, they restored some of the original features based on physical evidence, retained some of the 1940s features when there was no evidence of earlier treatments, and made a few changes based on personal taste. … Even with the alterations of the 1940s and 2014-2015, the house still strongly projects the feeling of a substantial and sophisticated dwelling from the turn of the nineteenth century in Forsyth County.”
    • The 2014-15 renovation included the construction of a one-story addition behind the house, connected to the original structure by a hallway. “Although large, the one-story frame addition was designed and built to be as sensitive as possible to the historic character of the original house and to have the least impact on it. Among other things, the addition housed a new kitchen and two bathrooms, so that these facilities did not interrupt the original fabric of the house.” (NRHP nomination)
    • The property is subject to a historic preservation and conservation covenant held by Preservation North Carolina.

608 Vance Street, Reidsville, Rockingham County
Villa Fortuna, aka The Jennings-Baker House
Jennings-Baker House NRHP
Blog post — Villa Fortuna: An Eclectic 1888 National Register Property in Reidsville, $99,900
listing withdrawn and relisted repeatedly since 2019
contract pending June 26-27, 2020

  • $200,000 (previously as low as $99,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2,188 square feet, 0.5 acre
  • Price/square foot: $91
  • Built in the late 1880s, per NRHP nomination
  • Listed February 26, 2019
  • Last sale: $25,000, June 2011
  • Note: For sale by owner
    • Listing: “the perfect blend of unpretentious elegance and a rustic urban farm.”
    • “This house is for someone with vision, passion and some skills would be handy.”
    • “The 30’x32, steel frame greenhouse has a block base. There is a 8’x12′ barn used for my goats. It is Amish made with a metal roof and 2 lofts. The woodshed is 3′ deep x 13′ long. There is an addition not included in the square footage. It includes a sun room, a pantry, and mud room off the driveway.”
    • Answering the most obvious question: “YES there is a urinal on the wall in the purple bedroom. The last owner put it there it is no longer hooked up.”
    • Previous listing: “The facing came off the back of the second story and squirrels got in and damaged the wiring in the ceiling of the purple bed room. All 22 windows need to be replaced [Editor’s note: or, better yet, repaired].”
    • NRHP nomination (1986): “… a distinctive example of a vernacular use of elements of the Gothic Revival and Italianate styles of architecture popular in the mid nineteenth century.”
    • The first owner and probable builder of the house was William G. Jennings, a brick manufacturer.
    • “Only six brick houses dating from the years prior to 1890 are known to survive in the city, and it is unlikely that any substantial number more were built. Of these six, five can be described as in the Italianate style or exhibiting Italianate influence. … The Jennings-Baker House is a much more vernacular and personal expression of Victorian tastes, as it combines elements of several styles. The triangular patterned brickwork above windows and doors on the facade have a vaguely Gothic flavor, while the segmental arch openings on the side and rear elevations and in the ell … are typical of masonry construction of the period. The facade’s projecting bays and porch suggest the influence of architecture predominantly found at military institutions, while the corbel table on the facade and the parapeted side elevations of the main block are reminiscent of commercial architecture in the late nineteenth century.”
    • “This combination of elements strengthens the possibility that Jennings may have intended his house as a sort of advertisement for what was then a young enterprise, exhibiting the products of his brick yard and demonstrating the masonry skills of his workers.”
    • If you’re a traveler from the East, the lodge meets next door.

Not Too Far Away

710 N. Lafayette Street, Shelby, Cleveland County
The James Heyward Hull House
contract pending July 27, 2021

  • $800,000
  • 8 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms, 5,869 square feet, 1.4 acres
  • Price/square foot: $136
  • Built in 1874 (see note below)
  • Listed November 9, 2019
  • Last sale: $37,000, April 1984
  • Note: The current real-estate listings for the house show 1840 as its date. The National Register nomination says 1874; county records show 1900, which seems the least likely.
    • The house has been in the Hull-Daniel family for 115 years.
    • NRHP nomination: “The James Heyward Hull House [is] an excellent example of a 1907 Neoclassical Revival style dwelling in Shelby, one of several built at the turn of the century by some of Shelby’s most prominent residents. The large two-story house was originally built ca. 1874 in the Italianate style for Methodist minister Hilary T. Hudson. James Heyward Hull, a cotton broker, bought the house in 1907 and had it transformed into a Neoclassical Revival style house by adding a monumental portico, flanking wings, an ornate deck-on-hip roof, and completely redoing the interior.”
    • “The residential Neoclassical Revival style was a monumental version of classical elements that became very popular among wealthy industrialists in North Carolina during the bustling “New South” era of the early twentieth century. Also known as ‘Southern Colonial,’ the principal feature was a colossal central portico with one-story porches extending out to the sides. Other characteristic elements of the style were the two-story massing and richly detailed classical columns, entrances, and eaves. The popularity of the style caused it to be chosen as the form for the North Carolina Building at the 1907 Jamestown Tercentennial Exposition in Norfolk, Virginia. The style came to be associated with the ‘new’ southern aristocracy, the cotton mill owners, cotton brokers, and cotton planters.” (footnote in original: “Bishir, Catherine W. North Carolina Architecture. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1990, pp. 420-423″)

411 W. Union Street, Morganton, Burke County
The Dr .Joseph Bennett Riddle House
contract pending October 5, 2021

  • $565,000 (originally $595,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,779 square feet, 0.76 acre
  • Price/square foot: $150
  • Built in 1892
  • Listed November 2019
  • Last sale: $425,000, July 1998
  • National Register nomination: “The c.1892 Riddle House is an exuberant and well-preserved Queen-Anne home, one of the best examples of that style in the western piedmont town of Morganton, seat of Burke County (N. C.). The house is located on a deep lot on the south side of West Union street, historically the preeminent neighborhood for Morganton’s professional and business upper-class. The street is characterized by many substantial late-Victorian or early-20th century Colonial Revival homes sited on large, well-Iandscaped lots. …
    • “It is the most ornate and substantial example remaining of the many Victorian-era homes built on the street by the town’s professional class during the l890s. The house is associated with Dr. Joseph Bennett Riddle, prominent local physician and surgeon who was long connected with Grace Hospital of Morganton.”