Historic Houses: Sales, Summer-Fall 2022

  • Sold for on September 28, 2022 $253,000 (originally $255,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 3,901 square feet, 0.27 acre
  • Price/square foot: $65
  • Built in 1918
  • Listed June 4, 2022
  • Last sale: $165,000, March 2022
  • Neighborhood: Old Post Road Historic District (local), Reidsville Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Three-month turn-around time for what the listing calls a “Full Home Renovation!”
    • District NRHP nomination: “Built before 1922 for physician and city health officer Dr. Samuel G. Jett, this large and relatively intact bungalow has many distinctive features.
    • “The main body of the square, one and one-half story frame residence is clad in weatherboard siding, while wood shingles cover the gable ends and nearly full-facade shed and gable dormer. Paired casement windows light the dormer, while a variety of nine over one fifteen over one sash and multi-paned casements are found in the rest of the house.
    • “Stuccoed arches spring from heavy brick piers to the engaged porch roof which continues from the side gable roof with its deep bracketed overhang.
    • “The house stands near the front of a typical narrow, but deep, well-shaded lot.”

604 Scott Avenue, Greensboro
The Chapman and Frances Harbour House

  • Sold for $810,000 on September 27, 2022 (originally $899,900)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,954 square feet, 0.83 acre
  • Price/square foot: $274
  • Built in 1917
  • Listed June 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $145,000, February 2021 (apparently wasn’t listed in MLS)
  • Neighborhood: Lindley Park
  • Note: Even reduced by $100,000, the price is spectacularly high for Lindley Park, which has been one of the more affordable older neighborhoods in Greensboro.
    • The original owners were Chapman Lee Harbour (1874-1951) and Frances Terry Harbour (1882-1958). Chapman was an inspector for South Atlantic Lumber Company. Later, he was a nurseryman in Colfax and lived in Asheboro.
    • Both came from large families in Patrick County, Virginia. Chapman was the first of 10 children, all but one of whom lived to adulthood (siblings: John, Starling, Victoria, Mary, Dovie, Exony, Zachary, William and Martha).
    • Frances was the 12th of 13 children. At least two died in childhood; two others lived to be 99 (she had eight siblings and four half-siblings: Julia, John, Samuel, Mary, Sarah, Ulysses Grant, Henry, James Madison, Joseph, Murray, William, and Carrie).
    • The Harbours sold the house in 1931 to George W. Brown (1866-1953) and Amelia Vandergriff Brown (1878-1949). They owned it until their deaths. Originally from Tennessee, they had been married since 1895. George was a superintendent and later a paving contractor, an occupation he took up at age 70 (according to the city directory).
    • In 1962 the house was sold to John Frank Yeattes Sr. (1890-1968) and Carrie R. Jobe Yeattes (1895-1994). Their family used the house as a rental and owned it for 59 years, until it was sold in 2021 for renovation. John was assistant clerk of Superior Court. Their son, John Frank Yeattes Jr. (1922-2010), was later a District Court judge in Guilford County.
    • How the house looked when it was sold in 2021:
  • Sold for $240,000 on September 26, 2022 (originally $235,000, later as low as $199,900 and as high as $275,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,680 square feet (per county), 0.9 acre
  • Price/square foot: $143
  • Built in 1890
  • Listed August 7, 2020
  • Last sale: $73,500, February 2002
  • Note: The property includes two rentals, one over the garage (two or three bedrooms — listings have varied — and one bathroom) and a double-wide (three bedrooms and two bathrooms). A previous listing said both were rented for $500/month.

1211 Forsyth Street, Winston-Salem

  • Sold for $780,000 on September 23, 2022 (not listed on MLS)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,162 square feet, 0.16 acre
  • Price/square foot: $247
  • Built in 1912
  • Wasn’t listed for sale in MLS
  • Last sale: $115,000, June 2014
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Restored in 2015
  • District NRHP nomination: “The oldest house on Forsyth St. is a large two-story frame dwelling of simple Colonial Revival design. It is characterized by a steep pyramidal roof sheathed in tin shingles with side pedimented cross gables and a front pedimented dormer and a wrap-around porch with Tuscan columns, a plain balustrade, and a slightly projecting entrance bay.”
    • In 1950 aluminum siding was installed, and the west corner of the porch was enclosed. “But the house as a whole, because of its scale, form, and detail, still [made] a positive contribution to the architectural character of the West End,” the nomination said. The aluminum siding has been removed; the house now has wood siding. The enclosed corner of the porch has been reopened.
    • “The house was depicted on the 1912 Sanborn map and listed in the 1913 city directory as the residence of D.C. Crutchfield. The occupancy changed, however, in the 1915 directory and again in 1916, when the house was listed for the first time as the residence of O.P. Schaub. Oscar P. Schaub [1873-1930] was a physician and surgeon, and he and his wife, Alice [Alice Carter Schaub, 1879-1950], lived in the house until the early 1930s, although tax records indicate it was actually owned by Burton Craig from 1919 to 1947.”
    • The Fred Pettyjohn family owned and occupied the house from 1961 to 2014.

210 Edgedale Drive, High Point
The Tucker-Alexander House

  • Sold for $392,500 on September 23, 2022 (originally $425,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,102 square feet, 0.23 acre
  • Price/square foot: $187
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $292,500, November 2019
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Listing: “Stamped concrete driveway carries into back yard/patio. House is wired for electric car.”
  • District NRHP nomination: “This two-story, side-gabled Period Cottage is four bays wide and double-pile with a two-story, projecting gabled bay on the facade.
    • “The house has a brick veneer and six-over-six, wood-sash windows. There are two pairs of twelve-light, Craftsman-style French doors in the projecting bay with paired, nine-light, Craftsman-style windows in the gable above.
    • “The roof of the front-gabled bay extends to the right (east) to shelter an inset entrance with arched brick opening. The door is a solid, batten door.
    • “There is a low gable on the right end of the facade, an exterior brick chimney in the right gable, and a one-story, flat-roofed bay at the left (west) end of the facade with a terrace on its roof. A low, hip-roofed porch extends from the right rear (northeast).
    • The house first appears in the city directory in 1927 with the residents listed as Royster M. Tucker (1903-1948), an engineer with North State Telephone Company, and Nell Hayden Tucker (1905-1995) in 1927. He stayed with the local phone company and continued to live in the house until his death from a heart attack at age 45. Although Royster Sr. never rose to the executive level of the company, their son, Royster Jr., and grandson Royster III, both became CEOs of the company.
    • Nell sold the house in 1951, apparently over the strenuous objections of the couple’s two minor children, Royster Jr. and Velva, who went to court, with a guardian ad litem, in an attempt to block the sale.
    • In 1962 the house was sold to Thomas Bruce Alexander (dates unknown). It remained in the Alexander family for 57 years, until Thomas Bruce Alexander II sold it in 2019. The first T. Bruce Alexander was a product manager for Phillips-Foscue, a manufacturer of rubber and foam products for the furniture industry.
  • Sold for $288,500 on September 23, 2022(originally $320,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,760 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $105
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 31, 2022
  • Last sales: $245,000 on September 16, 2021; $196,000, September 2020
  • Neighborhood: Lebanon Hills Historic District
  • Note: The house was previously listed with three bedrooms.
  • District National Register nomination: “A swooping asymmetrical front-gable roof is the defining feature of this two-story Tudor Revival house, which is frame with a textured stucco finish. The swooping part of the roof engages a corner entry porch with segmental-arched openings.
    • “Above is a picturesque segmental-arched casement window; other windows are six-over-one wood sash with a few one-over-one replacement sashes.
    • “At the top of the front and side gables is false half-timbering with cruck (curved) members. Other features include an exterior chimney with sloped shoulders on the east side, asphalt-shingle roofing, a wood panel front door, a modern shed-roofed back porch, and a wall along the east lot line with a granite pillar at the sidewalk.”
  • Sold for $155,000 on September 23, 2022 (originally $175,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 1,616 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $96
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed June 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $70,000, June 2021
  • Neighborhood: Douglas Heights
  • Note: Not owner-occupied

833 N. Elm Street, Greensboro
The Jennie Kerner House

  • Sold for $412,000 on September 21, 2022 (listed at $425,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,378 square feet, 0.15 acre
  • Price/square foot: $173
  • Built in 1925 (per county, probably earlier; see note)
  • Listed July 27, 2022
  • Last sale: $310,000, December 2013
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Zoned for offices, but it apparently has been used as a residential rental.
    • The property has an accessory dwelling unit now used for storage.
    • The original owner appears to have been Jennie D. Kerner (1863-1928), who appears at the address in the 1915 city directory. She was a widow (Robah Bascom Kerner, 1859-1893) and lived with her daughter, Robah Mae Kerner (1885-1976). The Kerns had three children. Robah Mae, born first, lived to be 90. The other two died in infancy.
    • By 1917, Jennie and Robah Mae apparently had left Greensboro. Robah Mae had married in 1915 (J. Randolph Sowell, 1889-1966) and later lived in High Point. Jennie may have moved to Kernersville. Robah Bascom Kerner’s father, Dr. Elias Kerner, was a member of the town’s founding family and its first physician. Jennie is buried there with her husband and the Kerner family.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Stucccoed, hip-roofed, three-bay structure; fluted Corinthian columns at front portico and enclosed south sun porch; entry features ornate leaded glass sidelights; large trabeated windows to either side of entry.”

1205 Huntsdale Road, Reidsville, Rockingham County
The Fred and Annie Klenner House

  • Sold for $449,900 on September 16, 2022 (originally $469,900)
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,870 square feet, 0.81 acre
  • Price/square foot: $116
  • Built in 1942
  • Listed July 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $300,000, October 2018
  • Note: French Country-style home, relatively uncommon around here
    • The original owners of the house were Dr. Frederick Robert Klenner Sr. (1907-1984) and Anne Hill Sharp Klenner (1914-2003). They married in 1937 and bought the property for $2,200 in 1941. There’s so much to say about Fred and Annie and, especially, their son, Frederick Jr., nicknamed Fritz. Fred, though, deserves attention in his own right. This is condensed from their pages on findagrave.com, for which someone has provided quite a bit of information:
    • Fred was a physician and a pioneering researcher on vitamin C. He was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania; in 1936 he graduated from the Duke University School of Medicine. Annie was a nurse at Duke Hospital. They settled in her hometown of Reidsville, where Fred began practicing medicine. Annie worked in the practice. She was an active garden club member and flower show judge as well.
    • One of Annie’s sisters was Susie Sharp, the first woman to serve as chief justice of the N.C. Supreme Court. If this is starting to sound familiar, you may be getting a bit queasy, but Dr. Klenner’s career is worth knowing about and tends to get lost in the gory details involving their horrible son.
    • “Beginning in the 1940s, Dr. Klenner began experimenting with megadoses of vitamins, mostly vitamin C, to treat a variety of medical disorders. From infants to the elderly, Klenner used large doses of vitamins to treat a wide range of medical disorders including polio and multiple sclerosis. His research of those treatments inspired others, including Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling. “In the 1988 Clinical Guide, Pauling is quoted as saying, ‘The early papers by Dr. Fred R. Klenner provide much information about the use of large doses of Vitamin C in preventing and treating many diseases. These papers are still important.’ “
    • While practicing medicine, he published 27 papers about the benefits of vitamin C therapy for over 30 diseases. “Then on May 23, 1946, Dr. Klenner made national headlines when he delivered the world’s first set of surviving identical black quadruplets, the Fultz Sisters, at the Annie Penn Hospital in Reidsville. In his opinion, Klenner attributed their survival to massive doses of vitamins that he administered to the babies while under his medical care.”
    • Unsurprisingly, many local doctors thought Fred was nuts. He claimed, though, that he treated over 10,000 patients with massive doses of vitamins over 30 years without any ill effects.
    • For better or worse, Fred died in 1984, missing the horror that was to come. Annie lived through it, dying at age 89 in 2003.
    • At some point in the early 1980s, their only child, Fritz (1952-1985), took up with his divorced first cousin, Susie Newsome (her mother was a sister of Annie Sharp Klenner and Susie Sharp). Susie Newsome was involved in an unpleasant custody dispute with her ex-husband, who also was from Reidsville but by then was living in New Mexico. Police believe it was Fritz who murdered Annie’s former mother-in-law and sister-in-law in 1984 and then her parents and grandmother in May 1985. On June 3, 1985, the pair killed her two young sons and, while being chased by police, died by blowing up their car with dynamite on N.C. 150 in Guilford County.
    • Jerry Bledsoe wrote a famous book about it, Bitter Blood.
    • It really is a nice house.
  • Sold for $765,000 on September 15, 2022 (listed at $695,000)
  • 3 bedrooms 4 bathrooms, 3,491 square feet, 0.22 acre
  • Price/square foot: $219
  • Built in 1922
  • Listed July 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $418,000, May 2015
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The original owners were Dr. Frederick James Pate (1885-1941) and Elizabeth Pate (dates unknown). Frederick was an ear-nose-and-throat doctor. He served as a captain in the medical corps in World War I. They lost the house to foreclosure in 1930.
    • From 1955 to 1997 the house was owned by Eberle William Carr (1907-1990) and Mildred Lee Refo Carr (1915-2004). William had served as a lieutenant commander in the Navy in Word War II. He was a vice president and trust officer with Security National Bank, which became North Carolina National Bank when it merged with Charlotte’s American Commercial Bank in 1960.

2882 Old Lexington Road, Asheboro, Randolph County
formerly the Maple Grove Dairy house

  • Sold for $462,500 on September 13, 2022 (listed at $469,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,401 square feet, 3.85 acres
  • Price/square foot: $193
  • Built in 1880
  • Listed July 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $277,000, July 2017
  • Note: The property includes a guest house and a two-car garage.
    • Located northwest of the town near Lake Lucas, a municipal lake created in 1943. “Most of the dairy pasture land is now under water, but the Maple Grove Dairy house itself still stands at 2882 Old Lexington Road.” (Notes on the History of Randolph County, NC)
  • Sold for $338,000 on September 9, 2022 (listed at $338,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms 2,849 square feet, 1.13 acres
  • Price/square foot: $119
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed July 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $95,000, June 1994
  • Note: The property includes part of a pond shared with a neighboring property.
  • Sold for $174,500 on September 9, 2022 (listed at $174,500)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,300 square feet, 2.56 acres
  • Price/square foot: $134
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed July 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $5,000, October 1998
  • Note: Located northwest of Eden, just off N.C 87.
    • The property includes a workshop, barn, gazebo, storage building, and a detached carport.

334 Cascade Avenue, Winston-Salem
The Frazier-Julian House

  • Sold for $501,000 on September 1, 2022 (listed at $424,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 1,904 square feet, 0.20 acre
  • Price/square foot: $263
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed July 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $140,000, February 2001
  • Neighborhood: Washington Park Historic District
  • Note: The house is across the street from Washington Park.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Gable-sided brick Colonial Revival house, three bays wide; gabled and elliptical-arched entrance hood over central entrance with sidelights.
    • “One-story side porch to west supported by square posts, balustraded flat roof, now glass-enclosed. One-story frame rear shed. House reroofed 1940. “Believed to have been built by Frazier (wife Treva Knott), a traveling salesman who later worked for the city. Frazier moved here from a boarding house on North Liberty in 1929, and may have lost this house in the Depression.”Walter K. Frazier, 1899-1942; Treva Tabiatha Knott Frazier, 1899-1983, epitaph on both graves: “The Lord is my shepherd. Psalms:23”
    • “Was also residence of William Graves, prominent attorney, until his death.” William Graves (1892-1937) was the attorney for actress Libby Holman, accused of murdering her husband, Z. Smith Reynolds. Z. Smith was the youngest son of R.J. Reynolds. He died of a gunshot wound to the head. Libby and a close frond of Reynolds were accused of murder. They beat the rap, and no one was convicted in the killing. In the first half of the 20th century, it was considered North Carolina’s Crime of the Century; even now, few cases rival it for that distinction (Jeffery MacDonald, perhaps).
    • Graves was a native of Mount Airy and opened a law practice there after serving in World War I. In 1923 he moved to Winston-Salem and practiced there until his rather early death.
    • From 1940 to 2001, the house was owned by Ira Julian (1905-1995) and Ruth Julian (1906-2004). Ira was an attorney. His brother Maurice was the founder of Julian’s College Shop in Chapel Hill and father of fashion designer Alexander Julian.
    • Ruth Julian was a prominent art collector. Her collection included works by Picasso, Georges Rouault and other major international figures but had a particular focus on North Carolina artists, including Maud Gatewood and Ben Owen.
  • Sold for $435,000 on September 1, 2022 (listed at $435,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,351 square feet, 0.31 acre
  • Price/square foot: $185
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed August 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $329,000, July 2020
  • Neighborhood: West Highlands
  • Sold for $350,000 (originally $244,900, later raised to $365,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,297 square feet (per county), 0.71 acre
  • Price/square foot: $111
  • Built in 1900
  • Listed October 1, 2019
  • Last sale: $130,000, August 2017
  • Note: The 2019 listing said there were four bedrooms.
    • Eight fireplaces

506 Woodland Drive, Greensboro
The Alex and Margaret Stockton House

  • Sold for $665,900 on August 29, 2022 (listed at $639,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,361 square feet, 0.29 acre
  • Price/square feet: $282
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed June 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, December 1989
  • Neighborhood: Latham Park
  • Listing: The property includes a guest house/office with a full bathroom and a fireplace that was originally used for cooking.
    • The original owners were Margaret and Alex Stockton, who bought the property from the J.A. Latham Co. in 1927. Alexander Lowrie Stockton (1876-1934) was managing editor of the Greensboro Daily News and vice president of the Greensboro News Co. and North State Engraving Co. Margaret R. Chambers Stockton (1881-1954) continued to live in the house after Alex’s death at age 58, selling it in 1940.

1188 W. 4th Street, Winston-Salem
The Fulton-Hinkle Apartments

  • Sold for $550,000 on August 29, 2022 (listed at $589,000)
  • Divided into four apartments, all about 1,100 square feet; bedrooms and bathrooms not specified; 4,158 square feet total; 0.37 acre
  • Price/square foot: $132
  • Built in 1918
  • Listed June 9, 2022
  • Last sale: $5,000, December 1934
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: The house was divided into apartments in the 1930s.
    • No central air conditioning
    • District NRHP listing: “This is a large two-story frame house of simple Craftsman style influence typical of many built in the 1910s and 1920s, including some in the West End. It is characterized by a low hip roof with widely overhanging eaves and shaped rafter ends, a front hipped dormer, large twelve-over-one sash windows, a broad central entrance with diamond-muntined sidelights and transom, and front and south side shed-roofed porches with tapered paneled posts on brick plinths and a plain balustrade.
    • “The porches are connected by a corner terrace. The recently added vinyl siding does minimum damage to the integrity of the house.
    • “The property was first listed for taxes by Thomas P. and Nannie Fulton in 1914, and in 1916 they were listed in the city directory at this location. Fulton was secretary-treasurer of the J. G. Fulton Tobacco Co. The Fultons occupied the house through the 1920s. In 1934 D.R., T.C., and Rebecca B. Hinkle, who lived next door, purchased the property, and by 1940 it had begun its many years as the Hinkle Apartments.”
    • The house is being sold by the Hinkles’ heirs.

216 Florence Street, Greensboro

  • Sold for $285,000 on August 29, 2022 (listed at $290,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms, 2,508 square feet, 0.15 acre
  • Price/square foot: $114
  • Built in 1915
  • Listed August 10, 2022
  • Last sale: Not identifiable in online records
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: “In need of extensive repairs.”
  • District NRHP nomination: “Colonial Revival, Residence, c.19l6”
    • The house doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1918. Insurance agent Erle Harris Austin (1881-1955) and Clara Alleine Brown Austin (1887-1962) were the original owners.
    • By 1920, Dr. Frank Alexander Sharpe (1889-1947) and Martha Burns Sharpe (1895-1973) had bought the house. Frank was a physician. They owned the house until 1931.

8 Vance Street, Lexington, Davidson County

  • Sold for $420,000 on August 25, 2022 (listed at $420,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 4,209 square feet, 0.49 acre
  • Price/square foot: $100
  • Built in 1927 per county but probably by 1916 (see note below)
  • Listed July 8, 2022
  • Last sale: $324,500, April 2020
  • Neighborhood: Lexington Residential Historic District
  • Something you don’t see every day: The property includes “two 100+ year old Deodar Cedar trees recognized by the Lexington Treasured Tree program”
  • District NRHP nomination: “Two-story, weatherboarded, side-gable-roofed Queen Anne/Colonial Revival with a one-and-one-half- story, hip-roofed addition with a large, gabled wall dormer on the front of the dwelling; full-width front porch with Doric columns spanned by a wood railing, a pediment over the entrance and a square corner gazebo with a pyramidal roof; 1/1 sash, single-leaf French door with sidelights and transom, brick interior chimneys with corbelled stacks, wood-shingled gables, rear porch with paneled posts.
    • “This dwelling appears on the 1916-17 city directory map and is illustrated on the 1923 Sanborn in its current form. Jacob A. and Fannie H. Lindsay occupied the house in 1925-26. Mr. Lindsay was the secretary-treasurer of Lexington Home Furnishing Company.”

1172 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston-Salem

  • Sold for $407,000 on August 22, 2022 (listed at $399,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,928 square feet, 0.21 acre
  • Price/square foot: $139
  • Built in 1925 (possibly later; see note)
  • Listed July 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $175,000, August 2004
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District
  • District NRHP nomination: “Period Cottage. Two and a half story; front gable; aluminum siding; shed-roof side dormers; six-light transom over single-light windows; gable-roof hood on knee braces with arched opening; side porch; front gable projection; bay window.”
    • The address doesn’t appear in the city directory until 1929, listed as vacant. In 1930, the resident was M. Elwood Tatum, general yard supervisor for Southern Railway.

1182 W. 4th Street, Winston-Salem
The Dull-Hinkle House

  • Sold for $410,650 on August 17, 2022 (listed at $365,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,939 square feet (per county), 0.35 acre
  • Price/square foot: $140
  • Built in 1911
  • Listed July 7, 2022
  • Last sale: $26,500, December 1986
  • Neighborhood: West End Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: The listing shows 3,275 square feet.
    • Listing: “Multiple garage spaces and outbuildings”
  • District NRHP nomination: “The Dull-Hinkle House is a late Victorian dwelling of simple Queen Anne style influence. The two-story frame hip-roofed house is dominated by a boldly projecting right front polygonal bay with a decoratively shingled gable and sawnwork corner brackets.
    • “Sanborn maps show that the porch, with its turned posts and balustrade and sawnwork brackets, originally wrapped around the north side of the house, but this side was enclosed at an undetermined date. In recent years the house was sheathed with vinyl siding, but this and the alteration of the porch have not destroyed its architectural character.
    • “The house was included on the 1912 Sanborn Hap, and the following year G.L. Dull was listed in the city directory at this location. He occupied the house through at least 1920. In 1932 D.R. and Rebecca B. Hinkle purchased the property, and the house remains in family ownership and occupancy [as of October 1986].”

518 Fountain Place, Burlington, Alamance County
The Atwater-Pyne House

  • Sold for $550,000 on August 16, 2022 (listed at $525,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,972 square feet, 0.56 acre
  • Price/square foot: $138
  • Built in 1923
  • Listed June 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $365,000, April 2016
  • Neighborhood: West Davis Street-Fountain Place Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Note: Home of J. Minetree Pyne and Jessie Ormand Pyne from 1963 to 1997 (owned by Alamance County Hospital 1963-1980 and by the Pynes 1980-1997). James Minetree Pyne (1917-1994) served as administrator of Alamance County Hospital from 1956 to 1980. He was a member of the first Alamance County Historical Commission. Preservation Burlington gives an annual award bearing his name to outstanding restorations of historic homes.
    • The property includes a detached three-car garage.
  • District NRHP nomination: “Built ca. 1925 for James Atwater, president of the Alamance Lumber Company, this two-story frame structure exhibits many of the hallmarks of the Colonial Revival style of architecture used for Period Houses of the 1920s and 1930s.
    • “Featuring a three-bay facade, the house has a side gable roof with a simple box cornice and now is clad in aluminum siding. Palladian windows light the attic area from the gable ends, and one-story side wings with flat balustraded roofs create a Georgian configuration.
    • “Single, stepped shoulder brick chimneys rise between the central block and the wings. Eight-over-twelve windows with five-light sidelights flank the classical entrance; the latter has an elliptical fanlight and four-pane sidelights and is sheltered by a gable-roofed single-bay entrance porch with paired Roman Doric columns.
    • “The house is situated at the center of a double lot and faces the fountain for which the street is named.”
    • Atwater (1982-1958) lived in the house until his death. It was sold to Alamance County Hospital after the death of his wife, Lillian Anderson Atwater (1876-1961).

912 W. Davis Street, Burlington, Alamance County

  • Sold for $472,000 on August 12, 2022 (listed at $445,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2,827 square feet, 0.43 acre
  • Price/square foot: $167
  • Built in 1935
  • Listed June 28, 2022
  • Last sale: $243,000, May 2011
  • Neighborhood: West Davis Street-Fountain Place Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Sanborn maps and city directories indicate a late 1930s construction date for this two-story frame Colonial Revival ‘Period House’ which features a gambrel roof, a full-facade shed dormer, and a brick exterior end chimney,
    • “The central bay of the three-bay facade is a sidelighted entrance framed by a one-story porch with pedimented gable roof on slender square posts.
    • “The house has several rear additions and has been altered by the installation of aluminum siding.”

4909 Old Way Road, Browns Summit, Guilford County
Blog post (2018) — Classic House of the Week: A Beautiful 1916 Farmhouse on 4 Acres near Browns Summit

  • Sold for $475,000 on August 10, 2022 (listed at $475,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,724 square feet, 3.66 acres
  • Price/square foot: $174
  • Built in 1916 (per county)
  • Listed June 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $283,500, May 2019
  • Note: The listing gives the date of the house as 1925 and shows only 2,445 square feet.
    • The property includes a workshop with electricity, a raised garden with a drainage system, and a two-stall barn.

84 Hillcrest Drive, High Point
The Clyde Farley House

  • Sold for $308,500 on August 9, 2022 (originally $350,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,038 square feet, 0.18 acre
  • Price/square foot: $151
  • Built in 1928
  • Listed May 25, 2022
  • Last sale: $85,000, April 1998
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood, Uptown Suburbs Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “This two-story, side-gabled, house has Colonial Revival- and Craftsman-style details. The house is two bays wide and double-pile with a one-story, side-gabled wing on the right (south) elevation and a two-story, gabled rear ell.
    • “The house has vinyl siding and six-over-one, wood-sash windows with shutters. The replacement door is sheltered by a front-gabled porch on square columns.
    • “A side-gabled screened porch and porte-cochere on the left (north) elevation are supported by square columns and may be a later addition.
    • “The earliest known occupant is Clyde F. Farley (Farley’s Garage) in 1927.”

4149 Old Lexington Road, Winston-Salem

  • Sold for $265,000 on August 9, 2022 (listed at $265,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,580 square feet, 3.46 acres
  • Price/square foot: $103
  • Built in 1921
  • Listed July 20, 2022
  • Last sale: Before 1970; specific date and amount not identifiable in online records

508 Piedmont Avenue, Gibsonville, Guilford County

  • Sold for $233,000 on August 3, 2022 (originally $240,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 1,872 square feet, 0.89 acre
  • Price/square foot: $124
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed June 17, 2022
  • Last sale: $158,000, February 2018

220 Tate Street, Greensboro

  • Sold for $482,500 on August 2, 2022 (listed at $500,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2,628 square feet, 0.16 acre
  • Price/square foot: $184
  • Built in 1905
  • Listed June 21, 2022
  • Last sale: $300,000, May 2021
  • Neighborhood: College Hill Historic District
  • Something you don’t see every day: The property owner admits to a zoning violation. “This home is currently being leased as a college rental at $3,125 a month ($625 a bedroom)” Greensboro zoning prohibits renting a singe-family residence to more than four unrelated persons. [Update: Violation reported to the city. Zoning enforcement staff couldn’t care less.]
  • District NRHP nomination: “Craftsman foursquare, Residence, 1920-25, Oscar F York. Ticket agent, Southern Railway”

519 Central Avenue, Burlington, Alamance County

  • Sold for $250,000 on August 1, 2022 (originally $250,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,924 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $130
  • Built in 1927
  • Listed June 2, 2022
  • Last sale: $160,000, August 2008
  • Note: The listing describes the house as “move-in ready” but shows no photos of the interior.

465 S. Hawthorne Road, Winston Salem

  • Sold for $470,000 on July 29, 2022 (listed at $489,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,747 square feet, 0.24 acre
  • Price/square foot: $171
  • Built in 1930
  • Listed May 18, 2022
  • Last sale: $338,000, September 2017
  • Neighborhood: Ardmore Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “Dutch Colonial Revival. One and a half story; side gambrel; shed-roof dormer sheathed in weatherboard; brick lower level; six-over-one, double-hung sash; gable-roof entry porch with barrel vault opening; fluted columns; side porch with roof balustrade; side porch.”

1604 N. College Park Drive, Greensboro 
The George O. Fowler House
Blog post — Classic House of the Week: ‘One of Greensboro’s Most Elegant’ Homes In College Park, $749,000 (previous listing)

  • Sold for $515,000 on August 2, 2022 (listed at $475,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,372 square feet, 0.58 acres
  • Price/square foot: $153
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed July 3, 2022
  • Last sale: $554,500, May 2022 (included a 0.32-acre lot behind the house facing Mayflower Street)
  • Neighborhood: College Park
  • Note: The property does not include an adjacent lot behind the house on Mayflower Drive.
    • Greensboro: An Architectural Record: “The Fowler House is one of Greensboro’s most elegant. Joining the Mediterranean and Spanish Revival styles, the yellow-brick villa is shaded by an arcade of fluted Doric columns that is topped by a green-tiled pent roof, brackets and a ballustrade.”
    • The original owners were George O. Fowler (1881-1948) and May Patterson Fowler (1884-1980). They bought the property in 1926; May sold it in 1970. George was manager of the Patterson Brothers grocery store, working with brothers, a sister and an uncle of May. He had joined the company by 1905 and in 1907 was listed as one of the proprietors. George and May married in 1912 and were together until his death 36 years later. She outlived him by 32 years but never remarried.

300 Wentworth Drive, Greensboro
The Leslie and Alyce Lane House

  • Sold for $1.175 million on July 22, 2022 (listed at $1.275 million)
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 3,563 square feet (per county), 0.48 acre
  • Price/square foot: $330
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed April 29, 2022
  • Last sale: $812,000, December 2005
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The first owners were Leslie Clute Lane (1885-1967) and Alyce Nealon Lane (1882-1966). Leslie was a traveling salesman. They bought the property in 1924 and lived in the house from 1926 to 1941.

590 Parkview Drive, Burlington, Alamance County

  • Sold for $415,000 on July 22, 2022 (originally $530,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, 3,186 square feet, 0.27 acre
  • Price/square foot: $130
  • Built in 1937
  • Listed May 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, January 2018
  • Neighborhood: Central Heights (NRHP study list)

1017 Tom Shelton Road, Sandy Ridge, Stokes County

  • Sold for $115,000 on July 20, 2022 (listed at $134,900)
  • 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2,184 square feet, 8.39 acres
  • Price/square foot: $53
  • Built in 1883
  • Listed April 23, 2022
  • Last sale: $65,500, April 2005
  • Listing: Bathroom renovations, including a whirlpool tub, are unfinished.

119 Sealy Drive, Trinity, Randolph County
Trinity Grange 794

  • Sold for $90,000 on July 15, 2022 (listed at $149,900)
  • 0 bedrooms, 2 half-bathrooms, 2,069 square feet, 1.3 acres
  • Price/square foot: $43
  • Built in 1940
  • Listed May 27, 2022
  • Last sale: The property hasn’t been sold since the building was constructed.
  • Listing: “Many possibilities, most of which would require re-zoning.”
    • It’s not a house, but it could be (zoned residential). The building was the home of Trinity Grange 794. It consists of a very large room, an office and a kitchen.
    • From Wikipedia: “The Grange, officially named The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, is a social organization in the United States that encourages families to band together to promote the economic and political well-being of the community and agriculture.[1] The Grange, founded after the Civil War in 1867, is the oldest American agricultural advocacy group with a national scope. The Grange actively lobbied state legislatures and Congress for political goals, such as the Granger Laws to lower rates charged by railroads, and rural free mail delivery by the Post Office.”

2309 Lafayette Avenue, Greensboro
Blog post on Greensboro Historic Homes — Two Million-Dollar Mansions Sell Suddenly in Irving Park, But You Still Have a Few to Choose From

  • Sold for $972,000 on July 15, 2022 (originally $1.049 million)
  • 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3,002 square feet, 0.66 acre
  • Price/square foot: $324
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed July 13, 2020
  • Last sale: $550,000, March 2003
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Listing: The property includes a detached 1,600 square-foot “guest house/garage/rec room/office” with two bathrooms. Also “Moss walkways, Blue Stone patios & Koi Pond.”
    • From 1924 to 1930, the property was sold five times. In 1930, it was bought by its first long-term owner, surgeon Richard B. Davis. He owned the house until 1945.
    • Hampton Shuping, an executive with J.P. Stevens and his wife, Margaret, owned the house from 1958 to 1982. Stevens may be best remembered today as the bitterly anti-union textile company that served as the villain in the film Norma Rae. Stevens’s resistance to unionization was characterized by The New York Times in 1981 as “one of the ugliest episodes in recent labor history.”

305 Cascade Avenue, Winston-Salem
The Gip Kimball House

  • Sold for $510,000 on July 12, 2022 (originally $479,000)
  • 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2,104 square feet, 0.17 acre
  • Price/square foot: $242
  • Built in 1920
  • Listed June 1, 2022
  • Last sale: $250,000, February 2013
  • Neighborhood: Washington Park Historic District (NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “The Gip I. Kimball House at 305 Cascade is a characteristic hipped-roof foursquare with weatherboarded first floor and shingled second floor. At the front is a full-front hipped-roof porch supported by square posts on shingled piers with a solid shingled porch balustrade. …
    • “Three asymmetrical bays in first floor, two bays of paired windows on second; most windows are vertical 3/1.
    • Weatherboarded first floor, shingled second floor. Corbelled brick interior chimney; one-story rear hipped ell, weatherboarded. …
    • “Kimball and wife Lucille moved here from 410 S. Liberty Street. He had been cashier with N&W Railway; by 1921 he was bookkeeper with Forsyth Chair Co.”

202 Fisher Park Circle, Greensboro
The John Walker Fry House

  • Sold for $985,000 on July 8, 2022 (listed at $985,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,474 square feet, 0.32 acre
  • Price/square foot: $284
  • Built in 1938 (per county, but certainly earlier; see note)
  • Listed June 4, 2022
  • Last sale: $685,000, November 2017
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District
  • Note: The city directory lists John Walker Fry as residing at this address by 1917, when the street was still called Park Place. The district’s National Register nomination dates it to 1915-1920.
    • Greensboro, An Architectural Record: “The retrained finish of this large four-square includes a simple Doric portico and a wide, overhanging, bellcast hipped roof and front dormer underpinned with exposed rafter ends.”
    • Fry (1854-1938) was chairman of Greensboro Bank & Trust Company, vice president of Greensboro Insurance & Realty Company, and president of Coveland Orchards.
    • By 1931, the house was occupied by twice-widowed John along with his third wife, and his nephew Fielding Lewis Fry (1892-1961) and wife Fannie Sommerville Williams Fry (1895-1983). Fielding was president of Fry & Stevens, an insurance agency (later Fielding L. Fry & Company). He served as mayor of Greensboro 1947-1949 and as chairman of Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina.
    • The Depression played no favorites, and in 1932, John lost the house to foreclosure. He and his wife moved to a rented house at 665 Chestnut Street in Dunleath, where he lived until he died in 1938.
    • Fielding and Fannie continued to live at 202 Fisher Park until around 1937, when they moved to 227 Fisher Park Circle.
    • The house was then occupied by Sidney Broaddus Allen (1897-1976) and his wife, Jessie Brandt Allen (1903-1980). Allen had been one of the two trustees who had foreclosed on the house. He was president of Greensboro Mortgage Company, Greensboro Investment Company and Tatum-Allen Coal Company. He bought the house out of foreclosure in 1943 and sold it in 1946.

828 Oaklawn Avenue, Winston-Salem

  • Sold for $874,500 on July 7, 2022 (listed at $835,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 3,395 square feet, 0.35 acre
  • Price/square foot: $258
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 20, 2022
  • Last sale: $583,000, June 2015
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
  • Note: The property includes a two-car detached carport.

2411 Glencoe Street, Glencoe Mill Village, Alamance County

  • Sold for $130,000 on July 6, 2022
  • 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,861 square feet, 0.27 acre
  • Price/square foot: $70
  • Built in 1890
  • Not listed with MLS
  • Last sale: $41,000, September 1999
  • Neighborhood: Glencoe Mill Village Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • District NRHP nomination: “The Glencoe Historic District is located on the east bank of Haw River about three miles north of Burlington in Alamance County.
    • “It is a typical but remarkably well-preserved example of nineteenth century industrial villages that once flourished in North Carolina’s Piedmont region. The district covers a little more than 100 acres and consists of three parts: 1) a manufacturing and commercial complex; 2) a power and water system; and 3) a residential and social unit. …“Of the 48 original wood frame dwellings, 41 remain. (Several houses are known to have burned down.) … The mill village includes three basic house configurations, all with brick nogging, hand sawed timbers, tin roofs, brick pier foundations and simple, functional design. Houses vary in size from three to six rooms, with 16′ by 16′ the average room size.
    • “Most of the houses are on Front and Back Streets (21 and 12, respectively). The predominant house type was originally a four room, two-story structure typical of North Carolina rural housing of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
    • “The front porches are two bays wide and supported by four unornamented posts. A central hallway open onto rooms to the east and west. The western rooms of houses on these two streets do not have windows on the river (west) side. Chimneys are set on the east.
    • “Upstairs there are usually two rooms, with the railing from the narrow staircase extending into the west room.
    • “Detached kitchens of brick and batten construction are set behind the houses; a typical kitchen was about 20′ by 12′. …
    • “A later modification of the mill housing is the kitchen, attached at the back of the east wing of most houses, forming an L. These rooms had, by 1910, largely replaced the detached kitchens, of which only a handful remain. The connected kitchens have chimneys and customarily have side porches facing the river and the mill (west).”

1101 Virginia Street, Greensboro

  • Sold for $680,000 on July 5, 2022 (listed at $629,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 2,254 square feet, 0.31 acre
  • Price/square foot: $302
  • Built in 1913
  • Listed May 6, 2022
  • Last sale: $550,000, March 2021
  • Neighborhood: Fisher Park Historic District (local and NRHP)
  • Listing: “meticulously restored”
    • The property includes an outdoor fireplace, outbuilding and hot tub.
    • District NRHP nomination: “Germain Revival: Clipped gables extend over 2nd-story windows, both of which have a flower box with rounded supports that match the exposed eaves of the main hipped roof; gabled portico has upturned eaves & a rounded arch supported by 2 battered posts; windows are in groups with small multi-paned upper sash.”
    • The original owners appear to have been cotton broker Robert L. Thompson and Anne Busbee Thompson. he original address appears to have been 300 W. Bessemer Avenue, an address that no longer exists. They sold the house in 1919 to Grover Cleveland Cox (1885-1944) and Mable C. Cox (1896-1928). Grover was secretary-treasurer of Gate City Motor Company, the local dealer for Oldsmobile, Chalmers, Cole and Overland cars.

Historic Homes: Sales, Winter-Spring 2022