The H.D. Poindexter Cottage: A National Register Property in Winston-Salem’s West End, $299,900

124 West End Boulevard is the smaller half of a two-house entry on the National Register of Historic Places. Winston-Salem’s H.D. Poindexter Houses date back to the 19th century and consist of two adjacent homes, the Poindexter House and the smaller Poindexter Cottage. The cottage was put up for sale last week at $299,900 and almost immediately went under contract.

The houses now stand side-by-side in the West End Historic District, but they started out a few blocks away in a neighborhood that was wiped out by the expansion of Winston-Salem business district in the mid-20th century. Their rescue was an early victory for preservation in the city. By the time the historic district was created, the Poindexter houses already had escaped into its friendly surroundings.

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New Listing: The Gibson House, An Ice Cream Man’s Mid-Century Modern Mansion in High Point, $775,000

Update: The house sold for $801,000, above the asking price by $26,000, on September 25, 2020.

When Sloan and Geneva Gibson built their home in 1955, they were thinking modern all the way. The great room has bi-fold doors with motorized screens, opening the room to the outdoors. It was among the first homes in High Point with heat and air conditioning from an electric heat pump, NCModernist says.

The house merits a mention in The Architecture of High Point North Carolina for, among other things, its landscaping, designed as part of the house to provide privacy, and the concrete, tinted green so it wouldn’t stand out so much. 

The Gibson House went on the market this week at $775,000. Even though it’s 65 years old, the listing describes it as “contemporary.” It started out modern, but it’s become timeless.

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New Listing: A 1927 Classic in Winston-Salem, Designed by Luther Lashmit, $599,000

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418 Oaklawn Avenue, Winston-Salem

The house was designed by Luther Lashmit. Lashmit, a partner in Northrup & O’Brien of Winston-Salem, designed two of the city’s most famous houses, Graylyn for Bowman Gray and the Internationalist classic Merry Acres for R.J. Reynolds Jr. (Merry Acres was donated to Wake Forest University, which, incredibly, demolished it.).

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The 1820 John Johnston House in Caswell County: An Immaculate Little Cottage on the National Register, $118,500

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Update: The house sold for $131,000 on June 26, 2020, $13,000 over the asking price. The owners accepted the offer May 30, two days after putting the house up for sale.

Caswell County has some of the grandest antebellum mansions in the state. The John Johnston House is something quite different and more rare. “Though members of the Johnston family were prominent in social and economic affairs in Caswell County from the eighteenth century onward, the significance of the house derives less from the specific historical contributions of its occupants than from its representation of a class of plantation residence that has rarely been preserved,” the home’s 1997 National Register nomination says.

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294 West End Boulevard: A 1920 Craftsman Gem in Winston-Salem, $445,000

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The last time 294 West End Boulevard was sold, it went for $65,000. That was in 1984, and the West End has changed a lot since then. The house went on the market today for $445,000. It’s a beautifully restored Craftsman; the price is in line with a similarly impressive Craftsman in the West End that’s also for sale now, 701 Manly Street, and other well-restored houses in the historic district over the past year.

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The 1839 Davie County Jail: A National Register Property in Mocksville Is For Sale in an Online Auction

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Update: The auction didn’t result in a sale, and the jail was taken off the market in December 2019. The other two houses were sold in the summer of 2020.

Davie County’s original jail was built in Mocksville in 1839, three years after the county was established. Now it’s the centerpiece of an online auction of five properties all on the same downtown corner. Prospective buyers can bid on the properties separately or all of them together.

The jail is the centerpiece. It housed the county’s most armed and dangerous for 70 years and then became a residence. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. In 2001 the current owner bought it and converted it to office use.

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312 S. Main Street: A Spectacular 1890 Painted Lady in Reidsville, $300,000

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Update: The house sold on August 28, 2019, for $305,312.

There are some remarkable houses for sale in Reidsville and Rockingham County, and 312 S. Main Street in Reidsville may be the most impressive of them. A Queen Anne of high style, beautifully preserved, it would be a standout in any neighborhood.

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Historic House of the Week: A 1790 Federal-Style Mansion in Caswell County on the National Register

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The Moore-Gwyn-Ewalt House and its 200 acres are now listed for sale at $1.75 million.

Update: The house remained for sale until February 2020, when it was taken off the market.

In the early decades of the nation’s history, Caswell County was one of North Carolina’s most prosperous and prominent counties. Long beyond living memory, though, its fortunes crashed. Now, about all that’s left of its glory years are some truly impressive houses, scattered here and there from Camp Springs and Cherry Grove up to Milton and Semora.

national-register-plaque transparent.fw.pngThe Moore-Gwyn-Ewalt House in the Locust Hill area is a beautiful example of Caswell’s glorious past — 6,226 square feet of Federal-style elegance on 200 unspoiled acres. The house was built in 1790; considerable square footage is in the form of two well-designed wings built in 1995. It was listed June 1 at $1.75 million. The address is 5869 U.S. Highway 158. Situated southwest of Yanceyville and close to N.C. 150, it’s within a relatively easy commute to Greensboro.

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