Historic Mansions

Updated September 21, 2020

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Featured Listing
Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties
Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties
Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

Recent Sales

302 Cherry Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
The Dr. Edward C. Ashby House
contract pending September 15, 2021

  • $650,000 (originally $725,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms and 2 half-baths, 4,782 square feet, 0.74 acre
  • Price/square foot: $136
  • Built in 1937
  • Listed July 25, 2020
  • Last sale: $425,000, April 2009
  • Neighborhood: Mount Airy Historic District (NRHP)
  • Listing: “Grand entry with spiral staircase, granite countertops, original lifetime slate roof, copper gutters. Finished attic. Original smokehouse on property with a mature English garden. The Dr. Edward C. Ashby house has undergone significant rehabilitation since 2009 to restore the home to its proper condition and to upgrade the home to current living standards.”
    • District NRHP nomination: “During the 1930s more academic versions of the Colonial Revival style were constructed reflecting Colonial Georgian and Federal periods. The district’s most outstanding example of this style is probably the Edward C. Ashby House at 302 Cherry Street (#220).
    • “Designed by the Winston-Salem architectural firm of Northup and O’Brien, the c. 1930 two-story brick house is five bays wide, has a steep slate-clad gable roof with paired interior end chimneys, round-arched dormers, a denticulated cornice, segmental-arched first story windows, and a handsome Classical entrance with dentiled pediment, Doric columns, and a round-arched transom.
    • “The interior has a graceful curved, Federal style staircase and both Georgian and Federal styles are represented in the trim and mantelpieces.”
    • Protective covenants are held by the Historic Preservation Foundation of  North Carolina.
    • Dr. Edward Clayton Ashby (1890-1957) was a physician and surgeon at Martin Memorial Hospital. He and Sara Belle Cabaniss Ashby (1892-1978) were married in 1917.

Greensboro, High Point and Guilford County

710 Country Club Drive, Greensboro
The J. Spencer Love House I

  • $7.495 million
  • 6 bedrooms, 7 full bathrooms, 3 half-bathrooms, 11,201 square feet, 3.3 acres
  • Price/square foot: $669
  • Built in 1937
  • Listed August 5, 2021
  • Last sale: $2.49 million, February 1997
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park Historic District
  • Listing: “In the late 1990’s the house underwent a total renovation by the present owners. Original features to the house include the Grand Foyer, Formal Living & Dining Rooms, Sunroom, Library, Kitchen, Butler Pantry’s, Morning Room, Six Bedrooms, inclusive of a magnificent primary suite with his & hers dressing rooms, baths.
    • “Lower level with Sauna, hot tub, bedroom, bath, exercise room & mechanical room. Pool House with two kitchens, two living areas & three bedrooms. The Cottage with open kitchen & living area, massive fireplace, two bedrooms, two baths, Carriage House with kitchen, bedroom & bath.
    • “Gazebo, Tennis Court & open air breeze back grounds overlooking beautifully maintained gardens. Picturesque park like grounds face Greensboro Country Club golf course.”
    • District NRHP nomination: “This was the residence of J. Spencer Love, president of Burlington Mills, and his family. The Love House is a palatial Georgian Revival mansion inspired by eighteenth century Virginia houses. It features Flemish bond brickwork, a steep hipped roof with segmental-arched dormers and a modillioned cornice, a five-bay facade with a swan’s neck pedimented entrance, a string course between floors, and brick corner quoins. Large one and two-story wings project from either side of the main block. An expansive landscaped lawn fronts the house and is bordered by a molded brick wall.”
    • James Spencer Love (1896-1962) was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His father, James Lee Love, was a professor of mathematics at Harvard and, more importantly, a native a Gastonia, where his father and brother owned a small mill called the Gastonia Cotton Manufacturing Company. After graduating from Harvard, J. Spencer went to Gastonia and in 1919 bought the company. In 1922 he moved it to Burlington and gave it a new name. “Shortly afterwards, he decided to gamble on a new product, rayon. Throughout his business career, Love continued to be bold, expanding frequently and seeking new products even in the hard times of the 1930s.” (Dictionary of North Carolina Biography) That kind of initiative turned his small mill into the largest textile company in the world, Burlington Industries.
    • Benjamin and Anne Cone bought the house in 1941 from Love’s ex-wife, Elizabeth Love Appleget. Cone (1899-1982) was a son of Ceasar and Jeannette Cone. He served as chairman of Cone Mills, 1957-71; mayor of Greensboro, 1949-51 (Greensboro mayors traditionally served only one term until the 1970s); and chairman of Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, 1956-65. He and his wife, Anne Coleman Wortham Cone (1915-1999), were major benefactors to the Weatherspoon Art Museum. They owned the house until 1977, when they sold it to Richard Love, a son of J. Spencer Love, and his wife, Bonnie B. Love. They sold the house in 1982.
    • in 1997, the house was bought by the current owner, Bonnie McElveen Hunter, founder and CEO of Greensboro’s Pace Communications, president of the American Red Cross and former ambassador to Finland, and her husband, Bynum Merritt Hunter (1925-2018).

303 Burke Street, Gibsonville, Guilford County
The Burke Manor Inn & Pavilion
listing withdrawn January 2021
relisted March 2021

  • $2.2 million
  • 6 bedrooms, 7 1/2 bathrooms, 5,166 square feet, 2.64 acres
  • Price/square foot: $426
  • Built in 1906
  • Listing date not known
  • Last sale: $1.1 million, January 2011
  • From the inn’s website: “Caesar Cone, a textile magnate and co-founder of Cone Mills Corporation, built the house on 303 Burke Street in 1906. In 1911, Caesar Cone sold the home to J.W. Burke, where 4 generations of the Burke family resided in the estate. The Brady Family bought Burke Manor in 1999 and restored the home to its original grandeur, as designed by the Cone family. The Brady’s converted the grounds into an inn with the idea of transforming the house into a bed & breakfast. The owners today, Lori and Lil Lacassagne, purchased Burke Manor in 2011.”
    • The property includes an in-ground pool.
815 woodland place 2019.jpg

815 Woodland Drive, Greensboro
The Haywood Duke House
listing removed May 10, 2011; relisted July 29, 2011
listing removed November 11, 2011; relisted February 22, 2012
listing removed May 24, 2012; relisted October 28, 2013
listing removed October 20, 2014; relisted February 24, 2015
listing removed May 24, 2016; relisted March 24, 2017
listing removed September 29, 2020
relisted August 23, 2021

  • $1.889 million (originally $1.89 million, later $1.59 million)
  • 5 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 5,215 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $362
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed January 8, 2011
  • Last sale: $1.7 million, June 2004
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: Haywood Duke was general manager of the King Cotton Hotel. The grand 13-story hotel stood downtown on Market Street at Davie, where the News & Record building now is, from 1927 to 1971.

206 Sunset Drive, Greensboro
The Jarboe-Orr House
contract pending August 8, 2021

  • $1.7 million (originally $1.749 million)
  • 4 bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms, 6,050 square feet, 0.60 acre
  • Price/square foot: $281
  • Built in 1915
  • Listed July 24, 2021
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Note: The property includes a stone koi pond, gazebo and outdoor fireplace.
    • It’s on the 14th green of Greensboro Country Club.
    • Greensboro: An Architectural Record — “The cleanly articulated Mediterranean Revival-style villa, designed by Raleigh James Hughes, was erected for Dr. [Parren] Jarboe in the mid-teens. Its elegant entry is marked by a round-arched door and transom and an Ionic portico topped by a Chinese Chippendale balustrade. Round arches and Ionic columns are repeated at its flanking first-story bays and latticed end pavilions. Its second story features shutters with fleur-de-lis cutouts, its roof curvilinear exposed brackets.”
    • Dr. Jarboe and his wife, Lucille, owned the house until 1934.
    • The house was owned for 53 years by two generations of the Orr family, major figures in the textile industry. In 1953, Burlington Mills executive Douglas M. Orr bought the house. He owned it for 29 years, selling it to his son (I think) Donald in 1982. Donald, also a textile executive, owned the house for 24 years.

2011 Granville Road, Greensboro
The L. Homer Hole House

  • $1.599 million (originally $1.75 million)
  • 7 bedrooms, 5 full bathrooms and two half-baths, 7,247 square feet, 1.4 acres
  • Price/square foot: $221
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed May 10, 2021
  • Last sale: $850,000, October 1987
  • Neighborhood: Irving Park
  • Greensboro: An Architectural Record: “A full-height portico of four columns fronts this Neoclassical Revival-style dwelling. In its shadow, the central entry is framed by an oversized Palladian surround.”
    • Lemuel Homer Hole (1874-1948) and Marguerite Forbes Hole (1885-1941) were the original owners. He was in the insurance business, according to the city directory (Greensboro: An Architectural Record says he was an executive with N.C. Public Service Company; the city directory’s roster of executives for the company doesn’t include him). He later served on the city Planning and Park Commission.

2210 Granville Road, Greensboro
The Joseph and Juanita Gorrell House

  • $1.299 million
  • 6 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms, 8,207 square feet, 0.77 acre
  • Price/square foot: $158
  • Built in 1958
  • Listed June 21, 2021
  • Last sale: $650,000, June 1997
  • Neighborhood: New Irving Park
  • Note: The property includes a swimming pool.
    • The 2100 and 2200 blocks of Granville Place, the two blocks north of Cornwallis Drive, first appeared in the city directory in 1959.
    • The first owners were Joseph Palmer Gorrell (1927-2003) and Juanita Taylor Gorrell (1928-1994). He was a career executive with Pilot Life and Jefferson-Pilot, retiring as vice president of the Securities Department. He was a Navy veteran of World War II and a graduate of Duke University and the Diplomatic School at Georgetown University. In 1992 he passed ownership to his daughter Eva Jane Gorrell Hendrix, who sold the house in 1996.

4719 Groometown Road, Greensboro
The Groome Inn

  • $1.25 million
  • 5 bedrooms, 6 1/2 bathrooms, 4,617 square feet, 7.8 acres
  • Price/square foot: $271
  • Built in 1900 (per county)
  • Listed August 25, 2021
  • Last sale: $249,000, November 2003
  • B&B website: “A rich tobacco community of leaders named for Zachariah Groome (1827-1904) bought this farmland in 1888. The Groome Family built this particular house around 1890.”
    • Zachariah was born in Caswell County in 1827 or 1828 (sources differ). By 1840, his family had moved to Rockingham County. He lived there until 1883, serving as a county commissioner 1869-72.
    • He moved briefly to Randolph County before buying 500 acres of land southwest of Greensboro in Guilford County and establishing the Groometown community.
    • Zachariah married Louisa Blackburn (1923-1850) in 1849. He married Lavinia Jane Whittemore (1835-1898) in 1852. They had 12 children, 11 of whom survived to adulthood.

907 Rockford Road, High Point
The Charles Kearns House

  • $775,000
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 4,306 square feet, 2.58 acres
  • Price/square foot: $180
  • Built in 1946
  • Listed September 4, 2021
  • Last sale: $235,000, May 1980
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood
  • Note: The original owner was Charles Leslie Kearns (1910-1979), executive vice president of Crown Hosiery Mills, which was founded by his father, Gurney Harriss Kearns. Charles was a longtime member of the Greensboro-High Point Airport Authority, president of the High Point Rotary Club and director of the Chamber of Commerce, High Point Hospital and other organizations. His brother, Amos, was secretary-treasure of Crown Hosiery and served as mayor of High Point.

642 Colonial Drive, High Point
The C. Myron Cecil House
Blog post — Extreme Makeover: Emerywood Edition — At 642 Colonial Drive, Only the Address Is the Same
listing withdrawn June 30, 2021; relisted July 15, 2021
listing expired September 16, 2021

  • $629,000 (originally $650,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, 4,624 square feet, 0.4 acre
  • Price/square foot: $136
  • Built in 1910
  • Listed December 7, 2020
  • Last sale: $58,000, April 2013
  • Neighborhood: Emerywood, Uptown Suburbs Historic District (NRHP)
  • Note: Before 2013, the last previous sale was in October 1969 for $34,000.
    • The first clue that something is up is the description in the neighborhood’s National Register nomination:
    • “The house has a brick veneer, brick chimney on the facade [no chimney] with a blind, stuccoed arch [no], and eight-over-eight, wood-sash windows with blind arches over the windows and door on the first story [no blind arches here, either]. The three-light-over-four-panel door is recessed slightly on the left end of the facade [no] and flanked by four-light sidelights [not]. A one-story, hip-roofed porch extends from the right elevation [no porch], supported by full-height brick piers. A one-story wing on the left elevation has paired, eight-light, metal casement windows [no wing, no casement windows].”
    • They meant the house in its caterpillar stage:
  • That’s 642 Colonial Drive in 2010. It appears to have emerged from its chrysalis between 2013 and 2019. The house sold for $58,000 in 2013, and a Google Street View photo dated June 2019 shows the house as it looks today.
  • The interior is remarkable — glorious ceilings, floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, French doors. How much of it is original is an interesting question.
  • District NRHP nomination: “The house is listed as vacant in 1929; the earliest known occupant is C. Myron Cecil (Cecil Grocery) in 1930.”

Winston-Salem and Forsyth County

1040 Arbor Road, Winston-Salem
The Alex and Mamie Gray Galloway Huse

  • $2.385 million
  • 6 bedrooms, 6 full bathrooms and two half-bathrooms, 8,461 square feet, 2.23 acres
  • Price/square foot: $282
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed September 2, 2021
  • Last sale: $1.71 million, September 2006
  • Neighborhood: Reynolda Park
  • Note: Designed by Luther Lashmit, original landscape design by Thomas Sears
    • Designated as a Forsyth County historic landmark, qualifying it for a tax credit of up to 50 percent
    • The main house’s entire slate roof was replaced in 2019.
    • The property includes 1,458-square-foot guesthouse with recently remodeled kitchen and bath, not included in the square footage.
    • The house was built for Alexander Henderson Galloway Jr. (1870-1935) and Mary Eliza “Mamie” Gray Galloway (1876-1944). Alex had a diverse career among Winston-Salem’s leading corporations, including Brown Brothers Tobacco Company, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco and Wachovia Bank. Later he was a partner in the Galloway and Jenkins Insurance Agency before serving as manager of the Carolina and Zinzendorf hotels.
    • Mamie attended Salem Academy and at Miss Carey’s School in Baltimore. She and Alex married in 1901. She was a younger sister of Bowman Gray, who became president and chairman of RJR. He also was a benefactor and the original namesake of the medical school at Wake Forest University. Their father, James Alexander Gray, was one of the founders of Wachovia.
    • Alex died in an auto accident on the Greensboro-Winston-Salem highway. Mamie suffered a stroke that night and died nine years later after another stroke.

7951 Lasater Road, Clemmons, Forsyth County
The Lasater Mill House
Blog post — New Listing: Northrup & O’Brien’s 1933 Lasater Mill House in Clemmons, $1.99 million

  • $1.99 million
  • 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 6,713 square feet, 2.94 acres
  • Price/square foot: $296
  • Built in 1933
  • Listed August 6, 2021
  • Last sale: $77,000, May 1976
  • Note: The house is on Lasater Lake, through which Blanket Creek flows on its way to the nearby Yadkin River.
    • The mill was designed by Northrup & O’Brien. It was built as an outbuilding for Robert E. Lasater (1867-1954), an executive of R.J. Reynolds, and his wife, Nancy Margaret Lybrook Lasater (1877-1952), a niece of R.J. Reynolds. Nancy’s mother, Mary Josephine Reynolds Lybrook (1844-1888), was a sister of RJR; she was the first of 12 children, only seven of whom survived to adulthood.
    • Listing: The mill house is functional.
    • “Listing includes three additional parcels including a boat house/guest quarters.”
    • A website that was never fully built out suggests the house was or was going to be an art gallery around 2009.
1819 buena vista road winston.jpg

1819 Buena Vista Road, Winston-Salem

  • $1.25 million
  • 7 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 4,062 square feet (per county records), 0.63 acre
  • Price/square foot: $308
  • Built in 1926
  • Listed July 22, 2020
  • Last sale: $445,500, April 1992
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
  • Note: For sale by owner
    • No photos are included with the listing — odd way to try to sell a house for more than $1 million. The photo above is from Google Street View, March 2016.
    • The entire description of the house: “Classic center hall colonial in the heart of Buena Vista. Great family home with pool, four car garage and nice lot. Walking distance to RJR high school, Brunson, Wiley, Whitaker and St Leos.”

411 S. Main Street, Old Salem, Winston-Salem
The Charles A. Cooper House

  • $1,050,000
  • 4 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 3,900 square feet
  • Price/square foot: $269
  • Built in 2006
  • Listed September 20, 2021
  • Last sale: $38,000, December 2001 (land only)
  • Listing: “Based on old photography, partially excavated foundation, and tons of research and experience, the home has been reconstructed to its original 1840’s appearance by historic home builder Steven Cole.” The house features reclaimed doors and iron work from the 1700’s, full mortise and peg windows made of heartpine wood and wavy glass, imported European bricks to line the fireplaces, and wide board white oak flooring on three of the four levels.
    • County records show the square footage as 2,628, which looks wrong.

734 Arbor Road, Winston-Salem
contract pending July 14, 2021

  • $960,000 (originally $1.1 million)
  • 6 bedrooms, 4 full bathrooms, 2 half-bathrooms, 4,933 square feet, 0.36 acre
  • Price/square foot: $195
  • Built in 1924
  • Listed May 28, 2021
  • Last sale: $675,000, July 2010
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista
926 oaklawn avenue winston

626 Oaklawn Avenue, Winston-Salem
contract pending August 9, 2021

  • $859,000 (originally $945,900)
  • 4 bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms, 4,629 square feet, 0.36 acre
  • Price/square foot: $186
  • Built in 1936
  • Listed June 8, 2020
  • Last sale: $55,730, September 1983
  • Neighborhood: Buena Vista

6265 Yadkinville Road, Pfafftown, Forsyth County
listing withdrawn September 6, 2021 (that was quick)

  • $749,900
  • 3 bedrooms, 4 full bathrooms, 2 half-bathrooms, 5,295 square feet, 4.57 acres
  • Price/square foot: $142
  • Built in 1925
  • Listed August 31, 2021
  • Last sale: $560,000, August 2018
  • Note: The property includes an indoor salt water exercise pool and pool-house, a tennis court and a 100-plus-year old barn.

Alamance, Caswell and Rockingham Counties

9950 Semora Road, Person County

  • $2.5 million
  • 7 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, 4,000 square feet, 92 acres
  • Price/square foot: $625
  • Built in 1840
  • Listed February 12, 2021
  • Last sale: $575,000, August 2012
  • Neighborhood: Hyco Lake
  • HOA: $150/year (Person Caswell Lake Authority)
  • Note: The property includes a barn, a guest house, a wedding venue, a garage, a workshop and three miles of trails.
    • It has a Semora (Caswell County) mailing address, but it’s just across the county line in Person County.

216 W. Hunter Street, Madison, Rockingham County
The Hunter House Bed & Breakfast
listing expired September 7, 2019; relisted March 5, 2021
listing withdrawn September 3, 2021

  • $450,000 (previously listed as high as $595,000 and as low as $368,000)
  • 6 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 4,790 square feet, 0.57 acre
  • Price/square foot: $94
  • Built in 1903
  • Listed July 23, 2018
  • Last sale: $365,000, August 2016
  • Note: The property includes seven fireplaces; main-level master with en-suite, 12’x11′ walk-in closet and private side yard; wrap-around front porch; large back yard with in-ground pool, hot tub, two pergolas and privacy fencing.

Stokes, Surry, Yadkin and Davie Counties

392 Old Rockford Road, Rockford, Surry County
contract pending July 29, 2021

  • $1.795 million
  • 4 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, 5,314 square feet, 65.22 acres
  • Price/square foot: $338
  • Built in 1887
  • Listed October 1, 2020
  • Last sale: $161,500, January 1989
  • Listing: “Totally private, meticulously restored and expanded historic country home with majestic Yadkin River views and frontage [1,600 feet]. … Log guest cabin, 2-stall barn, small greenhouse, kitchen garden, outbuildings, fenced pasture, and clear or salt-water pool with waterfall.”
    • County property record cards don’t typically offer subjective judgements, but the one for this place says, “BEAUTIFUL VIEW OF RIVER”.

618 N. Main Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
The William Edward Merritt House
Heart & Soul Bed & Breakfast

  • $750,000 (originally $850,000)
  • 7 bedrooms, 7 1/2 bathrooms, 5,024 square feet, 0.66 acre
  • Price/square foot: $149
  • Built in 1901
  • Listed July 8, 2021
  • Last sale: $152,000, April 2014
  • Neighborhood: Mount Airy Historic District
  • Note: The listing gives the square footage as 4,700.
    • District NRHP nomination: “Large, impressive two-story brick late Victorian style house with granite trim, dominated by a two-and-one-half story polygonal projecting bay and one-story wrap-around porch with spindle frieze.
    • “The virtually unaltered house also features decorative, tall, corbelled and recessed panel interior chimneys, one-over-one windows with granite lintels and sills, granite string course extending around the house above the second story windows, decorative sawn brackets supporting wide overhanging eaves and Colonial Revival interior features.
    • “Built in 1901 by contractor J.A. Tesh for W.E. Merritt, who owned a hardware store and brickyard, and was the founder of the Renfro Textile Company and one of the founders of the Mount Airy Furniture Company.”
    • William Edward “Ed” Merritt (1867-1946) was born in Chatham, Virginia. His wife, Caroline Octavia “Carrie” Kochtitzky Merritt (1868-1960), was a native of Oakland, Missouri. After they came to Mount Airy, Ed’s parents and five of his six siblings also moved to the town.
    • From the Mount Airy News: “As is often the case, this new blood energized and benefited the community, as they established or led several major businesses: Merritt Hardware, Renfro Hosiery, Mount Airy Furniture Company, Merritt Machine Shop, Piedmont Manufacturing Company, and Floyd Pike Electrical, the North Carolina Granite Corp., and others. Several family members have served as town commissioners, the city engineer, the Surry County Draft Board, the county Board of Commissioners, and in the US Navy and Army.”

302 Cherry Street, Mount Airy, Surry County
The Dr. Edward C. Ashby house

  • $650,000 (originally $725,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms and 2 half-baths, 4,782 square feet, 0.74 acre
  • Price/square foot: $136
  • Built in 1937
  • Listed July 25, 2020
  • Last sale: $425,000, April 2009
  • Neighborhood: Mount Airy Historic District (NRHP)
  • Listing: “Grand entry with spiral staircase, granite countertops, original lifetime slate roof, copper gutters. Finished attic. Original smokehouse on property with a mature English garden. The Dr. Edward C. Ashby house has undergone significant rehabilitation since 2009 to restore the home to its proper condition and to upgrade the home to current living standards.”
    • District NRHP nomination: “During the 1930s more academic versions of the Colonial Revival style were constructed reflecting Colonial Georgian and Federal periods. The district’s most outstanding example of this style is probably the Edward C. Ashby House at 302 Cherry Street (#220).
    • Designed by the Winston-Salem architectural firm of Northup and O’Brien, the c. 1930 two-story brick house is five bays wide, has a steep slate-clad gable roof with paired interior end chimneys, round-arched dormers, a denticulated cornice, segmental-arched first story windows, and a handsome Classical entrance with dentiled pediment, Doric columns, and a round-arched transom.
    • “The interior has a graceful curved, Federal style staircase and both Georgian and Federal styles are represented in the trim and mantelpieces.” (District NRHP nomination)
    • Protective covenants are held by the Historic Preservation Foundation of  North Carolina.
    • Dr. Edward Clayton Ashby (1890-1957) was a physician and surgeon at Martin Memorial Hospital. He and Sara Belle Cabaniss Ashby (1892-1978) were married in 1917.

1201 Crescent Drive, Mount Airy
The Lindsey Holcomb House

  • $629,000 (originally $650,000, later $695,000)
  • 5 bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, 4,492 square feet, 1.34 acres
  • Price/square foot: $140
  • Built in 1935
  • Listed August 16, 2021
  • Last sale: $175,000, July 1989
  • Neighborhood: Taylor Park Historic District
  • Listing: “Shown to qualified buyers only!”
    • Slate roof
    • District NRHP nomination: “The Winston-Salem architectural firm of Northup and O’Brien designed this rambling Colonial Revival residence for H. Lindsey Holcomb in 1934. Holcomb was an executive with Mount Airy’s Pine State knitwear company, along with John Springthorpe Sr. whose 1937 house is also in Taylor Park. The two-story brick-veneered house was completed the following year.
    • “The architects artfully juxtaposed the two-story core section with other sections of one, one-and-a- half, and two-story height, set in line or at right angles to the core, in order to create the appearance of a house with a long additive evolution. The multiple gable roof planes are sheathed with slate shingles and the white-painted brickwork has randomly projecting broken bricks that create an aged, weather-beaten look.
    • “Dentil cornices, formed by corbeled header bricks, cross the front elevations of the two-story side-gable core and a slightly lower two-story section which telescopes from the core’s north gable end. The non-symmetrical placement and grouping of the many six-over-six wood sash windows adds to the overall effect of age and accretive development.
    • “The front entry features a classical surround with dentils and a broken pediment with a center urn. An ornamental metal grille covers the front door. Chimneys, one interior and one exterior, punctuate the two main gable ends and a bay window projects from the front of a one-story front wing.
    • “A story-and-a-half wing connects to a three-bay garage at the rear, which has three gabled dormers on its roof. The connection is shown as open-air on the 1948 Sanborn map but is now enclosed. L. Holcomb’s name appears next to the house on the 1948 Sanborn map.”

524 Main Street, Pilot Mountain, Surry County

  • $325,500 (originally $309,000)
  • 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms, 4,118 square feet, 0.66 acre
  • Price/square foot: $77
  • Built in 1895
  • Listed January 23, 2021
  • Last sale: $225,000, November 2017
  • Note: For sale by owner

Davidson, Randolph and Montgomery Counties

745 Lexington Road, Asheboro, Randolph County

  • $1.8 million
  • 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 5,509 square feet, 19.2 acres
  • Price/square foot: $327
  • Built in 1938
  • Listed July 26, 2021
  • Last sale: $1 million, June 2000
  • Note: I haven’t been able to find a thing about the history of this place.
115 s. pearl street troy.png

115 S. Pearl Street, Troy, Montgomery County
listing withdrawn June 19, 2020; relisted August 15, 2020
contract pending May 9, 2021; no longer under contract May 9, 2021

  • $549,900 (originally $599,000)
  • 6 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms, 5,135 square feet, 0.42 acres (see note)
  • Price/square foot: $107
  • Built in 1892
  • Listed July 14, 2019
  • Last sale: Listing says it was in 1910; no further information is available online.
  • Listing: For sale by owner
    • The house is on a lot of 0.42 acre. The listing references two additional lots that are included, apparently another 0.43 acre total.
    • The house is across the street from the Montgomery County Courthouse.
    • “A portion of the home was the original town post office and has remained in the same family since 1910.”
    • “Remington chandeliers from Pennsylvania, mahogany over-mantles from plantations on the Mississippi River, fireplaces throughout. Hidden doorways and many nooks and crannies with quirky charm. … An impressive 2 story pine paneled entrance with original oak floors, stained glass window, and a massive staircase … Original 10′ & 12′ stamped metal ceilings. Elegant formal dining room has been known to seat 30+ family and guests. A fully stocked library with volumes of antique books. … 20×36 foot wine cellar in basement with stone fireplace and steel reinforced storm shelter.”
    • “Perfect for a bed and breakfast, home-based business, shop, office, educational facility or just a residence for large family or someone who welcomes an abundance of visitors.
    • “Entertainment/game/billiard room is 25 x 36 with pool table included. An indoor pool remains structured under the large billiard room floor if so desired to convert back into function.”
    • “A 64×32′ garage holds approx. 18 cars and is located on additional 2 lots (included) just perfect for a multitude of needs from collector cars to business product storage.”
    • This appears to be the garage:
115 s. pearl st. garage troy.png